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Why Hot Cross Buns Are an Easter Tradition

Why Hot Cross Buns Are an Easter Tradition


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The story behind this nursery rhyme and Easter staple

© Alexpro9500 | Dreamstime.com

In the lead-up to Easter, you have likely crossed your fair share of hot cross buns. For those unfamiliar with this Good Friday treat, traditional hot cross buns are filled with spices and fruits, both candied and plain, and topped with an iced or incised cross. But where was this tradition born?

Easter Recipes Perfect for Springtime

Food historians argue the small loaves are in the tradition of ancient Greek spring festival cakes. Across Europe in the early Common Era, pagans hosted springtime festivals celebrating fertility and birth. Tiny cakes were customary throughout those celebrations too. Some of the cakes, historians believe, were even marked with a cross.

However, the first recorded instance of a spiced bun topped with a cross in observance of Good Friday, according to FoodTimeline, was in the 1733 “Poor Robin’s Almanack.”

Sans-cross, Good Friday spiced buns were incredibly popular during the Tudor period in England (1485 to 1603). In 1592, Queen Elizabeth I of England declared that spiced buns only be sold for Good Friday, Christmas and burials. Buns for all other private ceremonies and celebrations were to be baked at home and any doughy contraband donated to the poor.

Not only revered for their religiosity, spiced buns were also said to hold healing and protective powers. People, believing they never molded, hung them from the ceiling throughout the year to ward off evil spirits. Sailors even grated the loaf and added it to water to form a medicine.

Remember to whip this factoid out at your small Easter gathering, along with the reason why dye Easter eggs and other fun holiday food mysteries.


Hot Cross Buns Recipe – An Easter Weekend Tradition

I have to admit, I had never heard of Hot Cross Buns until just a few years ago.

I wanted to make Sweet Rolls for a family brunch that we had scheduled. So I went to my computer and began to search for recipes.

There were Hawaiian Rolls, Sweet Rolls, Cinnamon Rolls and Hot Cross Buns that kept popping up in my search results.

A tray of Hot Cross Buns ready to be served at our Easter brunch.

Of course I knew what they all were, except for one. From the picture, it was obvious why there were called Hot Cross Buns.

Each roll was marked with a cross shape on top. From the picture that I saw, it looked like icing was piped across the top.

The picture sparked my interest and I knew that I had to find out more about this recipe. So I clicked the link to see what I could learn.

The Significance of Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are spiced sweet rolls that are made with raisins or currants. The are typically served in various parts of the world to signify the end Lent.

Traditionally they were served on Good Friday and each part of the bun has a certain meaning.

The buns are now ready to be baked.

The cross on top represents the crucifixion of Jesus. And the spices are said to signify the spices used during the burial process.

There are records that they have been served in the United Kingdom since before the 1600&rsquos. And they are popular in other countries as well.

After reading about Hot Cross Buns, I was almost ashamed that I had never heard of them. However, I decided that this was one recipe that I had to try.

Making The Dough

The recipe starts with making the dough for the buns. But it can&rsquot just be any dough.

The dough for Hot Cross Buns must have the addition of spices and raisins/currants.

Brushing the tops of the baked Hot Cross Buns with a sweet glaze.

Orange zest, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg are added to the dough to give it a sweet yet spiced flavor.

And after looking at the recipe it might be surprising that the yeast isn&rsquot dissolved in a mixture of sugar and water.

Beyond popular belief, active dry yeast really don&rsquot need to be dissolved in water before use.

If it is fresh the yeast will dissolve with the standard liquid required in most recipes.

Yes, you can dissolve it if you want to and because you always have. However, I am always looking for ways to simplify recipes.

The buns have been taken out of the oven and the glaze has been added.

I add the yeast along with my dry ingredients and the dough rises and turns out perfect every time.

Making the Cross

Traditionally the cross on top of the Hot Cross Buns were made using shortcrust pastry.

However, a more common way in today&rsquos society is to use a paste made from flour and water.

And those pictures that I saw that looked like the cross was made from icing was true!

In some parts of America, icing is used in place of the pastry or paste to make the cross.

Although that sounds delicious, when I make this recipe I prefer to use the paste to make the cross.

Adding the cross to the tops of the buns.

After the dough has been separated into rolls, I add the paste to the top of each one and the cross is baked right in.

No need to add icing. Especially when there is already a sugar glaze brushed on top after baking!

Now I make these Hot Cross Buns for Easter brunch every year!

And to save time on a busy Easter morning, I made them a day ahead of time and refrigerate them until they are ready to be baked!


Hot Cross Buns Recipe – An Easter Weekend Tradition

I have to admit, I had never heard of Hot Cross Buns until just a few years ago.

I wanted to make Sweet Rolls for a family brunch that we had scheduled. So I went to my computer and began to search for recipes.

There were Hawaiian Rolls, Sweet Rolls, Cinnamon Rolls and Hot Cross Buns that kept popping up in my search results.

A tray of Hot Cross Buns ready to be served at our Easter brunch.

Of course I knew what they all were, except for one. From the picture, it was obvious why there were called Hot Cross Buns.

Each roll was marked with a cross shape on top. From the picture that I saw, it looked like icing was piped across the top.

The picture sparked my interest and I knew that I had to find out more about this recipe. So I clicked the link to see what I could learn.

The Significance of Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are spiced sweet rolls that are made with raisins or currants. The are typically served in various parts of the world to signify the end Lent.

Traditionally they were served on Good Friday and each part of the bun has a certain meaning.

The buns are now ready to be baked.

The cross on top represents the crucifixion of Jesus. And the spices are said to signify the spices used during the burial process.

There are records that they have been served in the United Kingdom since before the 1600&rsquos. And they are popular in other countries as well.

After reading about Hot Cross Buns, I was almost ashamed that I had never heard of them. However, I decided that this was one recipe that I had to try.

Making The Dough

The recipe starts with making the dough for the buns. But it can&rsquot just be any dough.

The dough for Hot Cross Buns must have the addition of spices and raisins/currants.

Brushing the tops of the baked Hot Cross Buns with a sweet glaze.

Orange zest, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg are added to the dough to give it a sweet yet spiced flavor.

And after looking at the recipe it might be surprising that the yeast isn&rsquot dissolved in a mixture of sugar and water.

Beyond popular belief, active dry yeast really don&rsquot need to be dissolved in water before use.

If it is fresh the yeast will dissolve with the standard liquid required in most recipes.

Yes, you can dissolve it if you want to and because you always have. However, I am always looking for ways to simplify recipes.

The buns have been taken out of the oven and the glaze has been added.

I add the yeast along with my dry ingredients and the dough rises and turns out perfect every time.

Making the Cross

Traditionally the cross on top of the Hot Cross Buns were made using shortcrust pastry.

However, a more common way in today&rsquos society is to use a paste made from flour and water.

And those pictures that I saw that looked like the cross was made from icing was true!

In some parts of America, icing is used in place of the pastry or paste to make the cross.

Although that sounds delicious, when I make this recipe I prefer to use the paste to make the cross.

Adding the cross to the tops of the buns.

After the dough has been separated into rolls, I add the paste to the top of each one and the cross is baked right in.

No need to add icing. Especially when there is already a sugar glaze brushed on top after baking!

Now I make these Hot Cross Buns for Easter brunch every year!

And to save time on a busy Easter morning, I made them a day ahead of time and refrigerate them until they are ready to be baked!


Hot Cross Buns Recipe – An Easter Weekend Tradition

I have to admit, I had never heard of Hot Cross Buns until just a few years ago.

I wanted to make Sweet Rolls for a family brunch that we had scheduled. So I went to my computer and began to search for recipes.

There were Hawaiian Rolls, Sweet Rolls, Cinnamon Rolls and Hot Cross Buns that kept popping up in my search results.

A tray of Hot Cross Buns ready to be served at our Easter brunch.

Of course I knew what they all were, except for one. From the picture, it was obvious why there were called Hot Cross Buns.

Each roll was marked with a cross shape on top. From the picture that I saw, it looked like icing was piped across the top.

The picture sparked my interest and I knew that I had to find out more about this recipe. So I clicked the link to see what I could learn.

The Significance of Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are spiced sweet rolls that are made with raisins or currants. The are typically served in various parts of the world to signify the end Lent.

Traditionally they were served on Good Friday and each part of the bun has a certain meaning.

The buns are now ready to be baked.

The cross on top represents the crucifixion of Jesus. And the spices are said to signify the spices used during the burial process.

There are records that they have been served in the United Kingdom since before the 1600&rsquos. And they are popular in other countries as well.

After reading about Hot Cross Buns, I was almost ashamed that I had never heard of them. However, I decided that this was one recipe that I had to try.

Making The Dough

The recipe starts with making the dough for the buns. But it can&rsquot just be any dough.

The dough for Hot Cross Buns must have the addition of spices and raisins/currants.

Brushing the tops of the baked Hot Cross Buns with a sweet glaze.

Orange zest, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg are added to the dough to give it a sweet yet spiced flavor.

And after looking at the recipe it might be surprising that the yeast isn&rsquot dissolved in a mixture of sugar and water.

Beyond popular belief, active dry yeast really don&rsquot need to be dissolved in water before use.

If it is fresh the yeast will dissolve with the standard liquid required in most recipes.

Yes, you can dissolve it if you want to and because you always have. However, I am always looking for ways to simplify recipes.

The buns have been taken out of the oven and the glaze has been added.

I add the yeast along with my dry ingredients and the dough rises and turns out perfect every time.

Making the Cross

Traditionally the cross on top of the Hot Cross Buns were made using shortcrust pastry.

However, a more common way in today&rsquos society is to use a paste made from flour and water.

And those pictures that I saw that looked like the cross was made from icing was true!

In some parts of America, icing is used in place of the pastry or paste to make the cross.

Although that sounds delicious, when I make this recipe I prefer to use the paste to make the cross.

Adding the cross to the tops of the buns.

After the dough has been separated into rolls, I add the paste to the top of each one and the cross is baked right in.

No need to add icing. Especially when there is already a sugar glaze brushed on top after baking!

Now I make these Hot Cross Buns for Easter brunch every year!

And to save time on a busy Easter morning, I made them a day ahead of time and refrigerate them until they are ready to be baked!


Hot Cross Buns Recipe – An Easter Weekend Tradition

I have to admit, I had never heard of Hot Cross Buns until just a few years ago.

I wanted to make Sweet Rolls for a family brunch that we had scheduled. So I went to my computer and began to search for recipes.

There were Hawaiian Rolls, Sweet Rolls, Cinnamon Rolls and Hot Cross Buns that kept popping up in my search results.

A tray of Hot Cross Buns ready to be served at our Easter brunch.

Of course I knew what they all were, except for one. From the picture, it was obvious why there were called Hot Cross Buns.

Each roll was marked with a cross shape on top. From the picture that I saw, it looked like icing was piped across the top.

The picture sparked my interest and I knew that I had to find out more about this recipe. So I clicked the link to see what I could learn.

The Significance of Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are spiced sweet rolls that are made with raisins or currants. The are typically served in various parts of the world to signify the end Lent.

Traditionally they were served on Good Friday and each part of the bun has a certain meaning.

The buns are now ready to be baked.

The cross on top represents the crucifixion of Jesus. And the spices are said to signify the spices used during the burial process.

There are records that they have been served in the United Kingdom since before the 1600&rsquos. And they are popular in other countries as well.

After reading about Hot Cross Buns, I was almost ashamed that I had never heard of them. However, I decided that this was one recipe that I had to try.

Making The Dough

The recipe starts with making the dough for the buns. But it can&rsquot just be any dough.

The dough for Hot Cross Buns must have the addition of spices and raisins/currants.

Brushing the tops of the baked Hot Cross Buns with a sweet glaze.

Orange zest, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg are added to the dough to give it a sweet yet spiced flavor.

And after looking at the recipe it might be surprising that the yeast isn&rsquot dissolved in a mixture of sugar and water.

Beyond popular belief, active dry yeast really don&rsquot need to be dissolved in water before use.

If it is fresh the yeast will dissolve with the standard liquid required in most recipes.

Yes, you can dissolve it if you want to and because you always have. However, I am always looking for ways to simplify recipes.

The buns have been taken out of the oven and the glaze has been added.

I add the yeast along with my dry ingredients and the dough rises and turns out perfect every time.

Making the Cross

Traditionally the cross on top of the Hot Cross Buns were made using shortcrust pastry.

However, a more common way in today&rsquos society is to use a paste made from flour and water.

And those pictures that I saw that looked like the cross was made from icing was true!

In some parts of America, icing is used in place of the pastry or paste to make the cross.

Although that sounds delicious, when I make this recipe I prefer to use the paste to make the cross.

Adding the cross to the tops of the buns.

After the dough has been separated into rolls, I add the paste to the top of each one and the cross is baked right in.

No need to add icing. Especially when there is already a sugar glaze brushed on top after baking!

Now I make these Hot Cross Buns for Easter brunch every year!

And to save time on a busy Easter morning, I made them a day ahead of time and refrigerate them until they are ready to be baked!


Hot Cross Buns Recipe – An Easter Weekend Tradition

I have to admit, I had never heard of Hot Cross Buns until just a few years ago.

I wanted to make Sweet Rolls for a family brunch that we had scheduled. So I went to my computer and began to search for recipes.

There were Hawaiian Rolls, Sweet Rolls, Cinnamon Rolls and Hot Cross Buns that kept popping up in my search results.

A tray of Hot Cross Buns ready to be served at our Easter brunch.

Of course I knew what they all were, except for one. From the picture, it was obvious why there were called Hot Cross Buns.

Each roll was marked with a cross shape on top. From the picture that I saw, it looked like icing was piped across the top.

The picture sparked my interest and I knew that I had to find out more about this recipe. So I clicked the link to see what I could learn.

The Significance of Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are spiced sweet rolls that are made with raisins or currants. The are typically served in various parts of the world to signify the end Lent.

Traditionally they were served on Good Friday and each part of the bun has a certain meaning.

The buns are now ready to be baked.

The cross on top represents the crucifixion of Jesus. And the spices are said to signify the spices used during the burial process.

There are records that they have been served in the United Kingdom since before the 1600&rsquos. And they are popular in other countries as well.

After reading about Hot Cross Buns, I was almost ashamed that I had never heard of them. However, I decided that this was one recipe that I had to try.

Making The Dough

The recipe starts with making the dough for the buns. But it can&rsquot just be any dough.

The dough for Hot Cross Buns must have the addition of spices and raisins/currants.

Brushing the tops of the baked Hot Cross Buns with a sweet glaze.

Orange zest, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg are added to the dough to give it a sweet yet spiced flavor.

And after looking at the recipe it might be surprising that the yeast isn&rsquot dissolved in a mixture of sugar and water.

Beyond popular belief, active dry yeast really don&rsquot need to be dissolved in water before use.

If it is fresh the yeast will dissolve with the standard liquid required in most recipes.

Yes, you can dissolve it if you want to and because you always have. However, I am always looking for ways to simplify recipes.

The buns have been taken out of the oven and the glaze has been added.

I add the yeast along with my dry ingredients and the dough rises and turns out perfect every time.

Making the Cross

Traditionally the cross on top of the Hot Cross Buns were made using shortcrust pastry.

However, a more common way in today&rsquos society is to use a paste made from flour and water.

And those pictures that I saw that looked like the cross was made from icing was true!

In some parts of America, icing is used in place of the pastry or paste to make the cross.

Although that sounds delicious, when I make this recipe I prefer to use the paste to make the cross.

Adding the cross to the tops of the buns.

After the dough has been separated into rolls, I add the paste to the top of each one and the cross is baked right in.

No need to add icing. Especially when there is already a sugar glaze brushed on top after baking!

Now I make these Hot Cross Buns for Easter brunch every year!

And to save time on a busy Easter morning, I made them a day ahead of time and refrigerate them until they are ready to be baked!


Hot Cross Buns Recipe – An Easter Weekend Tradition

I have to admit, I had never heard of Hot Cross Buns until just a few years ago.

I wanted to make Sweet Rolls for a family brunch that we had scheduled. So I went to my computer and began to search for recipes.

There were Hawaiian Rolls, Sweet Rolls, Cinnamon Rolls and Hot Cross Buns that kept popping up in my search results.

A tray of Hot Cross Buns ready to be served at our Easter brunch.

Of course I knew what they all were, except for one. From the picture, it was obvious why there were called Hot Cross Buns.

Each roll was marked with a cross shape on top. From the picture that I saw, it looked like icing was piped across the top.

The picture sparked my interest and I knew that I had to find out more about this recipe. So I clicked the link to see what I could learn.

The Significance of Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are spiced sweet rolls that are made with raisins or currants. The are typically served in various parts of the world to signify the end Lent.

Traditionally they were served on Good Friday and each part of the bun has a certain meaning.

The buns are now ready to be baked.

The cross on top represents the crucifixion of Jesus. And the spices are said to signify the spices used during the burial process.

There are records that they have been served in the United Kingdom since before the 1600&rsquos. And they are popular in other countries as well.

After reading about Hot Cross Buns, I was almost ashamed that I had never heard of them. However, I decided that this was one recipe that I had to try.

Making The Dough

The recipe starts with making the dough for the buns. But it can&rsquot just be any dough.

The dough for Hot Cross Buns must have the addition of spices and raisins/currants.

Brushing the tops of the baked Hot Cross Buns with a sweet glaze.

Orange zest, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg are added to the dough to give it a sweet yet spiced flavor.

And after looking at the recipe it might be surprising that the yeast isn&rsquot dissolved in a mixture of sugar and water.

Beyond popular belief, active dry yeast really don&rsquot need to be dissolved in water before use.

If it is fresh the yeast will dissolve with the standard liquid required in most recipes.

Yes, you can dissolve it if you want to and because you always have. However, I am always looking for ways to simplify recipes.

The buns have been taken out of the oven and the glaze has been added.

I add the yeast along with my dry ingredients and the dough rises and turns out perfect every time.

Making the Cross

Traditionally the cross on top of the Hot Cross Buns were made using shortcrust pastry.

However, a more common way in today&rsquos society is to use a paste made from flour and water.

And those pictures that I saw that looked like the cross was made from icing was true!

In some parts of America, icing is used in place of the pastry or paste to make the cross.

Although that sounds delicious, when I make this recipe I prefer to use the paste to make the cross.

Adding the cross to the tops of the buns.

After the dough has been separated into rolls, I add the paste to the top of each one and the cross is baked right in.

No need to add icing. Especially when there is already a sugar glaze brushed on top after baking!

Now I make these Hot Cross Buns for Easter brunch every year!

And to save time on a busy Easter morning, I made them a day ahead of time and refrigerate them until they are ready to be baked!


Hot Cross Buns Recipe – An Easter Weekend Tradition

I have to admit, I had never heard of Hot Cross Buns until just a few years ago.

I wanted to make Sweet Rolls for a family brunch that we had scheduled. So I went to my computer and began to search for recipes.

There were Hawaiian Rolls, Sweet Rolls, Cinnamon Rolls and Hot Cross Buns that kept popping up in my search results.

A tray of Hot Cross Buns ready to be served at our Easter brunch.

Of course I knew what they all were, except for one. From the picture, it was obvious why there were called Hot Cross Buns.

Each roll was marked with a cross shape on top. From the picture that I saw, it looked like icing was piped across the top.

The picture sparked my interest and I knew that I had to find out more about this recipe. So I clicked the link to see what I could learn.

The Significance of Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are spiced sweet rolls that are made with raisins or currants. The are typically served in various parts of the world to signify the end Lent.

Traditionally they were served on Good Friday and each part of the bun has a certain meaning.

The buns are now ready to be baked.

The cross on top represents the crucifixion of Jesus. And the spices are said to signify the spices used during the burial process.

There are records that they have been served in the United Kingdom since before the 1600&rsquos. And they are popular in other countries as well.

After reading about Hot Cross Buns, I was almost ashamed that I had never heard of them. However, I decided that this was one recipe that I had to try.

Making The Dough

The recipe starts with making the dough for the buns. But it can&rsquot just be any dough.

The dough for Hot Cross Buns must have the addition of spices and raisins/currants.

Brushing the tops of the baked Hot Cross Buns with a sweet glaze.

Orange zest, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg are added to the dough to give it a sweet yet spiced flavor.

And after looking at the recipe it might be surprising that the yeast isn&rsquot dissolved in a mixture of sugar and water.

Beyond popular belief, active dry yeast really don&rsquot need to be dissolved in water before use.

If it is fresh the yeast will dissolve with the standard liquid required in most recipes.

Yes, you can dissolve it if you want to and because you always have. However, I am always looking for ways to simplify recipes.

The buns have been taken out of the oven and the glaze has been added.

I add the yeast along with my dry ingredients and the dough rises and turns out perfect every time.

Making the Cross

Traditionally the cross on top of the Hot Cross Buns were made using shortcrust pastry.

However, a more common way in today&rsquos society is to use a paste made from flour and water.

And those pictures that I saw that looked like the cross was made from icing was true!

In some parts of America, icing is used in place of the pastry or paste to make the cross.

Although that sounds delicious, when I make this recipe I prefer to use the paste to make the cross.

Adding the cross to the tops of the buns.

After the dough has been separated into rolls, I add the paste to the top of each one and the cross is baked right in.

No need to add icing. Especially when there is already a sugar glaze brushed on top after baking!

Now I make these Hot Cross Buns for Easter brunch every year!

And to save time on a busy Easter morning, I made them a day ahead of time and refrigerate them until they are ready to be baked!


Hot Cross Buns Recipe – An Easter Weekend Tradition

I have to admit, I had never heard of Hot Cross Buns until just a few years ago.

I wanted to make Sweet Rolls for a family brunch that we had scheduled. So I went to my computer and began to search for recipes.

There were Hawaiian Rolls, Sweet Rolls, Cinnamon Rolls and Hot Cross Buns that kept popping up in my search results.

A tray of Hot Cross Buns ready to be served at our Easter brunch.

Of course I knew what they all were, except for one. From the picture, it was obvious why there were called Hot Cross Buns.

Each roll was marked with a cross shape on top. From the picture that I saw, it looked like icing was piped across the top.

The picture sparked my interest and I knew that I had to find out more about this recipe. So I clicked the link to see what I could learn.

The Significance of Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are spiced sweet rolls that are made with raisins or currants. The are typically served in various parts of the world to signify the end Lent.

Traditionally they were served on Good Friday and each part of the bun has a certain meaning.

The buns are now ready to be baked.

The cross on top represents the crucifixion of Jesus. And the spices are said to signify the spices used during the burial process.

There are records that they have been served in the United Kingdom since before the 1600&rsquos. And they are popular in other countries as well.

After reading about Hot Cross Buns, I was almost ashamed that I had never heard of them. However, I decided that this was one recipe that I had to try.

Making The Dough

The recipe starts with making the dough for the buns. But it can&rsquot just be any dough.

The dough for Hot Cross Buns must have the addition of spices and raisins/currants.

Brushing the tops of the baked Hot Cross Buns with a sweet glaze.

Orange zest, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg are added to the dough to give it a sweet yet spiced flavor.

And after looking at the recipe it might be surprising that the yeast isn&rsquot dissolved in a mixture of sugar and water.

Beyond popular belief, active dry yeast really don&rsquot need to be dissolved in water before use.

If it is fresh the yeast will dissolve with the standard liquid required in most recipes.

Yes, you can dissolve it if you want to and because you always have. However, I am always looking for ways to simplify recipes.

The buns have been taken out of the oven and the glaze has been added.

I add the yeast along with my dry ingredients and the dough rises and turns out perfect every time.

Making the Cross

Traditionally the cross on top of the Hot Cross Buns were made using shortcrust pastry.

However, a more common way in today&rsquos society is to use a paste made from flour and water.

And those pictures that I saw that looked like the cross was made from icing was true!

In some parts of America, icing is used in place of the pastry or paste to make the cross.

Although that sounds delicious, when I make this recipe I prefer to use the paste to make the cross.

Adding the cross to the tops of the buns.

After the dough has been separated into rolls, I add the paste to the top of each one and the cross is baked right in.

No need to add icing. Especially when there is already a sugar glaze brushed on top after baking!

Now I make these Hot Cross Buns for Easter brunch every year!

And to save time on a busy Easter morning, I made them a day ahead of time and refrigerate them until they are ready to be baked!


Hot Cross Buns Recipe – An Easter Weekend Tradition

I have to admit, I had never heard of Hot Cross Buns until just a few years ago.

I wanted to make Sweet Rolls for a family brunch that we had scheduled. So I went to my computer and began to search for recipes.

There were Hawaiian Rolls, Sweet Rolls, Cinnamon Rolls and Hot Cross Buns that kept popping up in my search results.

A tray of Hot Cross Buns ready to be served at our Easter brunch.

Of course I knew what they all were, except for one. From the picture, it was obvious why there were called Hot Cross Buns.

Each roll was marked with a cross shape on top. From the picture that I saw, it looked like icing was piped across the top.

The picture sparked my interest and I knew that I had to find out more about this recipe. So I clicked the link to see what I could learn.

The Significance of Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are spiced sweet rolls that are made with raisins or currants. The are typically served in various parts of the world to signify the end Lent.

Traditionally they were served on Good Friday and each part of the bun has a certain meaning.

The buns are now ready to be baked.

The cross on top represents the crucifixion of Jesus. And the spices are said to signify the spices used during the burial process.

There are records that they have been served in the United Kingdom since before the 1600&rsquos. And they are popular in other countries as well.

After reading about Hot Cross Buns, I was almost ashamed that I had never heard of them. However, I decided that this was one recipe that I had to try.

Making The Dough

The recipe starts with making the dough for the buns. But it can&rsquot just be any dough.

The dough for Hot Cross Buns must have the addition of spices and raisins/currants.

Brushing the tops of the baked Hot Cross Buns with a sweet glaze.

Orange zest, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg are added to the dough to give it a sweet yet spiced flavor.

And after looking at the recipe it might be surprising that the yeast isn&rsquot dissolved in a mixture of sugar and water.

Beyond popular belief, active dry yeast really don&rsquot need to be dissolved in water before use.

If it is fresh the yeast will dissolve with the standard liquid required in most recipes.

Yes, you can dissolve it if you want to and because you always have. However, I am always looking for ways to simplify recipes.

The buns have been taken out of the oven and the glaze has been added.

I add the yeast along with my dry ingredients and the dough rises and turns out perfect every time.

Making the Cross

Traditionally the cross on top of the Hot Cross Buns were made using shortcrust pastry.

However, a more common way in today&rsquos society is to use a paste made from flour and water.

And those pictures that I saw that looked like the cross was made from icing was true!

In some parts of America, icing is used in place of the pastry or paste to make the cross.

Although that sounds delicious, when I make this recipe I prefer to use the paste to make the cross.

Adding the cross to the tops of the buns.

After the dough has been separated into rolls, I add the paste to the top of each one and the cross is baked right in.

No need to add icing. Especially when there is already a sugar glaze brushed on top after baking!

Now I make these Hot Cross Buns for Easter brunch every year!

And to save time on a busy Easter morning, I made them a day ahead of time and refrigerate them until they are ready to be baked!


Hot Cross Buns Recipe – An Easter Weekend Tradition

I have to admit, I had never heard of Hot Cross Buns until just a few years ago.

I wanted to make Sweet Rolls for a family brunch that we had scheduled. So I went to my computer and began to search for recipes.

There were Hawaiian Rolls, Sweet Rolls, Cinnamon Rolls and Hot Cross Buns that kept popping up in my search results.

A tray of Hot Cross Buns ready to be served at our Easter brunch.

Of course I knew what they all were, except for one. From the picture, it was obvious why there were called Hot Cross Buns.

Each roll was marked with a cross shape on top. From the picture that I saw, it looked like icing was piped across the top.

The picture sparked my interest and I knew that I had to find out more about this recipe. So I clicked the link to see what I could learn.

The Significance of Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are spiced sweet rolls that are made with raisins or currants. The are typically served in various parts of the world to signify the end Lent.

Traditionally they were served on Good Friday and each part of the bun has a certain meaning.

The buns are now ready to be baked.

The cross on top represents the crucifixion of Jesus. And the spices are said to signify the spices used during the burial process.

There are records that they have been served in the United Kingdom since before the 1600&rsquos. And they are popular in other countries as well.

After reading about Hot Cross Buns, I was almost ashamed that I had never heard of them. However, I decided that this was one recipe that I had to try.

Making The Dough

The recipe starts with making the dough for the buns. But it can&rsquot just be any dough.

The dough for Hot Cross Buns must have the addition of spices and raisins/currants.

Brushing the tops of the baked Hot Cross Buns with a sweet glaze.

Orange zest, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg are added to the dough to give it a sweet yet spiced flavor.

And after looking at the recipe it might be surprising that the yeast isn&rsquot dissolved in a mixture of sugar and water.

Beyond popular belief, active dry yeast really don&rsquot need to be dissolved in water before use.

If it is fresh the yeast will dissolve with the standard liquid required in most recipes.

Yes, you can dissolve it if you want to and because you always have. However, I am always looking for ways to simplify recipes.

The buns have been taken out of the oven and the glaze has been added.

I add the yeast along with my dry ingredients and the dough rises and turns out perfect every time.

Making the Cross

Traditionally the cross on top of the Hot Cross Buns were made using shortcrust pastry.

However, a more common way in today&rsquos society is to use a paste made from flour and water.

And those pictures that I saw that looked like the cross was made from icing was true!

In some parts of America, icing is used in place of the pastry or paste to make the cross.

Although that sounds delicious, when I make this recipe I prefer to use the paste to make the cross.

Adding the cross to the tops of the buns.

After the dough has been separated into rolls, I add the paste to the top of each one and the cross is baked right in.

No need to add icing. Especially when there is already a sugar glaze brushed on top after baking!

Now I make these Hot Cross Buns for Easter brunch every year!

And to save time on a busy Easter morning, I made them a day ahead of time and refrigerate them until they are ready to be baked!



Comments:

  1. Gusida

    What do you have in mind?

  2. Ya'qub

    You must say you are wrong.



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