Other

Reds from Patagonia and Other New Wine Delights

Reds from Patagonia and Other New Wine Delights


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The latest crop of releases includes good Champagne, a couple of Urugyan whites, and some good offerings from Argentina — including bargains from the country’s southern Patagonia region.

Boizel Champagne Brut Reserve NV ($55). Rich on the palate with some tropical fruit notes, nice granularity, and a clean finish.

Boizel Champagne Brut Rosé NV ($57). Very fresh and floral with a crisp finish (picture a butterfly dancing on a tightrope).

Boizel Champagne Blanc de Blanc NV ($66). A straightforward sparkler with tart apple flavors and a very crisp finish.

Matua Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2016 ($12). Lightly spritzy — gas added? — which emphasizes the lively green fruit flavors.

Garzón Uruguay Albariño Reserve 2016 ($17). Very nice, with typical albariño floral notes and a lively, crisp finish.

Garzón Uruguay Sauvignon Blanc Reserve 2016 ($17). Lively and crisp lime flavors with medium body and a tangy finish.

Priest Ranch Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc 2016 ($20). This is the anti-Marlborough of sauvignon blancs — full-bodied, with floral notes and a hint of tropical fruits.

Côté Mas Rosé “Aurore” 2016 ($8). A delightfully complex yet quaffable pink with interesting spice and floral notes and orange and cherry flavors.

Ferraton Samorëns Côtes du Rhône Red Wine 2015 ($12). A full Côtes-du-Rhône, more like a village-designated bottling than its appellation would suggest, with its rounded cherry flavors and good tannins.

Postales del Fin del Mundo Patagonia Cabernet-Malbec 2016 ($12). Good for the price — Bordeaux-like cherry flavors, although not much complexity

Postales del Fin do Mundo Patagonia Malbec 2016 ($12). Tangy cherry flavors with some balancing barrel notes.

Bonterra California Cabernet Sauvignon 2015 ($14). From organically grown grapes, this one has enjoyable, ripe fruit — still tightly wound — with some savory notes.

Fin del Mundo Patagonia Pinot Noir Reserva 2014 ($17). Pleasant, light-bodied pinot with dark and rooty full flavors.

Ravenswood Sonoma County Old Vine Zinfandel 2014 ($17). Tart cherry and berry flavors and good structure and toasty tannins in the finish.

Humberto Canale Patagonia Malbec Gran Reserva 2015 ($20). Enjoyable light, tart, fresh cherry flavors — a good companion for barbecue.

Monteviejo Lindaflor “Petite Fleur” Uco Valley Red Blend 2012 ($20). Assertive but smooth, with creamy cherry flavors, some floral notes, and a firm finish.

Ruffina Lodola Nuova Vino Nobile di Montepulciano 2012 ($25). A reasonably priced vino nobile with macerated cherry flavors and mineral hints.

Hess Collection “Allomi” Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2015 ($29). Rich intensity, with juicy cherry flavors and some plums in the finish.

Fin del Mundo “Special Blend” Patagonia Red Wine 2012 ($37). Quite nice, with dark fruits and buttery barrel notes, and smooth tannins.

Monteviejo Lindaflor Uco Valley Malbec 2010 ($41). Assertive in a good way, with dark berry flavors, a hint of sootiness, and lots of tannins.

Tapiz “Black Tears” Uco Valley Malbec 2012 ($48). Very warm and generous, with complex, muddled cherry fruits, nice tannin, and dried spices in the finish.

2015 Bouchaine Pommard Clone Carneros Pinot Noir 2015 ($50). Generous but well-balanced cherry fruit along with some savory notes and flavorful tannins.

Double Canyon Horse Heaven Hills Cabernet Sauvignon 2014 ($65). Very good red cherry flavors — on the bright side, but with savory undertones.

Monteviejo Lindaflor “La Violeta” Uco Valley Malbec 2010 ($113). Big, delicious, at 15 percent alcohol, with lots of tannins and concentrated but not jammy fruit. It gets the juices flowing!

Graham’s Otima 10-Year-Old Tawny Port ($30). A light-bodied port with good richness and flavors of roasted chestnuts and light molasses.


The Ever Expanding World of Wine Takes Your Palate to Unexpected Places

For all of recorded history and even before, wine has been intrinsic to the lives of the Greeks, Romans, and other peoples of the Mediterranean and Caucasus regions. The best wines in ancient times were largely reserved for a select few. For others, wine was rough, sour, acrid—consumed not in pursuit of some form of connoisseurship but largely because it was safer than water.

Related Content

Most wines were consumed locally, not far from where they were made. By the 18th and 19th centuries, however, some wines were identified as better than the rest and became commodities to be shipped to wherever they were in demand. Their names became famous: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, sherry, port, Madeira, Rhine wine.

In the past quarter century, this portfolio has expanded dramatically. We now live in an era that would be almost unrecognizable to wine lovers of our grandparents’ generation. Never before have so many different wines, from so many places, in so many diverse styles, been available to so many people around the globe.

Of the seven continents, only Antarctica does not have vineyards. Australia, South America, Africa, North America, and Asia have all joined in. While the wines of Argentina and Chile sell by the millions of bottles each year in the United States, wines from Uruguay and Brazil are now also appearing in stores. Israel and Lebanon, South Africa and Turkey all make good wine. And let’s not forget India, Thailand, Japan, and China, which have their own adolescent wine industries.

Closer to home, every state in the U.S. now makes wine. A lot of it is not very good, but you’d be surprised at the high quality coming from unexpected places. The Finger Lakes region of New York has taken its place as a world-class producer of Riesling. So has northern Michigan. I’ve had fine wine from Idaho and Utah and, yes, even from Texas.

In New Mexico, the Gruet winery makes excellent sparkling wine from grapes grown in the Rio Grande Valley. And speaking of sparkling wine, some terrific bottles now come from the south coast of England, where the pale calcareous soil—picture the White Cliffs of Dover—is very much like
the famous chalky terrain of
France’s Champagne region. It used to be considered too cold to make fine wine in England. But that was before climate change.

Even more exciting than the new producers of wine are the age-old areas that were little known before, but are now thrilling wine lovers everywhere. Sicily, for example, was known for making vast quantities of dull, powerful wine, often used to punch up weak vintages in France. Now the reds and whites of Mount 
Etna and the Vittoria region are superb, complex, and delicious.

The Greek island Santorini was never known for good wine. Neither were the Canary Islands of Spain. But the vibrant whites of Santorini are now a vivacious pleasure with seafood, while the reds of the Canaries are great values for smart wine lovers.

The list of historic wine localities discovered by the rest of the world in recent years goes on and on. The Jura in eastern France, with its peculiar yellow wines and pale reds, was ignored even by the French. Now its wines are prized in San Francisco, Tokyo, and New York. Few people even 10 years ago had heard of Ribeira Sacra, in western Spain, where the breathtakingly steep slopes rising from rivers were first planted with grapevines by the Romans. Now their delicious reds, made from the Mencía grape, are a worldwide delight.

Each year the discoveries continue. Some of the most exciting have happened in countries where vigorous wine cultures that had thrived for centuries were stanched by the collectivist economics of communist governments. The country of Georgia, hidden away 
in the Caucasus on the hinge between Europe and Asia, may well have been the place wine was invented several millennia ago. Today some of its best wines are still made using ancient methods and are thoroughly idiosyncratic and wonderful.

The choices can seem so vast that wine lovers today sometimes feel intimidated. It can seem easier to open a familiar Merlot, or even grab a beer. But for the adventurous spirit, the rewards of going farther afield are vast. Wine is so much more than a grocery list of flavors in a glass. It’s an invitation to explore.


The Ever Expanding World of Wine Takes Your Palate to Unexpected Places

For all of recorded history and even before, wine has been intrinsic to the lives of the Greeks, Romans, and other peoples of the Mediterranean and Caucasus regions. The best wines in ancient times were largely reserved for a select few. For others, wine was rough, sour, acrid—consumed not in pursuit of some form of connoisseurship but largely because it was safer than water.

Related Content

Most wines were consumed locally, not far from where they were made. By the 18th and 19th centuries, however, some wines were identified as better than the rest and became commodities to be shipped to wherever they were in demand. Their names became famous: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, sherry, port, Madeira, Rhine wine.

In the past quarter century, this portfolio has expanded dramatically. We now live in an era that would be almost unrecognizable to wine lovers of our grandparents’ generation. Never before have so many different wines, from so many places, in so many diverse styles, been available to so many people around the globe.

Of the seven continents, only Antarctica does not have vineyards. Australia, South America, Africa, North America, and Asia have all joined in. While the wines of Argentina and Chile sell by the millions of bottles each year in the United States, wines from Uruguay and Brazil are now also appearing in stores. Israel and Lebanon, South Africa and Turkey all make good wine. And let’s not forget India, Thailand, Japan, and China, which have their own adolescent wine industries.

Closer to home, every state in the U.S. now makes wine. A lot of it is not very good, but you’d be surprised at the high quality coming from unexpected places. The Finger Lakes region of New York has taken its place as a world-class producer of Riesling. So has northern Michigan. I’ve had fine wine from Idaho and Utah and, yes, even from Texas.

In New Mexico, the Gruet winery makes excellent sparkling wine from grapes grown in the Rio Grande Valley. And speaking of sparkling wine, some terrific bottles now come from the south coast of England, where the pale calcareous soil—picture the White Cliffs of Dover—is very much like
the famous chalky terrain of
France’s Champagne region. It used to be considered too cold to make fine wine in England. But that was before climate change.

Even more exciting than the new producers of wine are the age-old areas that were little known before, but are now thrilling wine lovers everywhere. Sicily, for example, was known for making vast quantities of dull, powerful wine, often used to punch up weak vintages in France. Now the reds and whites of Mount 
Etna and the Vittoria region are superb, complex, and delicious.

The Greek island Santorini was never known for good wine. Neither were the Canary Islands of Spain. But the vibrant whites of Santorini are now a vivacious pleasure with seafood, while the reds of the Canaries are great values for smart wine lovers.

The list of historic wine localities discovered by the rest of the world in recent years goes on and on. The Jura in eastern France, with its peculiar yellow wines and pale reds, was ignored even by the French. Now its wines are prized in San Francisco, Tokyo, and New York. Few people even 10 years ago had heard of Ribeira Sacra, in western Spain, where the breathtakingly steep slopes rising from rivers were first planted with grapevines by the Romans. Now their delicious reds, made from the Mencía grape, are a worldwide delight.

Each year the discoveries continue. Some of the most exciting have happened in countries where vigorous wine cultures that had thrived for centuries were stanched by the collectivist economics of communist governments. The country of Georgia, hidden away 
in the Caucasus on the hinge between Europe and Asia, may well have been the place wine was invented several millennia ago. Today some of its best wines are still made using ancient methods and are thoroughly idiosyncratic and wonderful.

The choices can seem so vast that wine lovers today sometimes feel intimidated. It can seem easier to open a familiar Merlot, or even grab a beer. But for the adventurous spirit, the rewards of going farther afield are vast. Wine is so much more than a grocery list of flavors in a glass. It’s an invitation to explore.


The Ever Expanding World of Wine Takes Your Palate to Unexpected Places

For all of recorded history and even before, wine has been intrinsic to the lives of the Greeks, Romans, and other peoples of the Mediterranean and Caucasus regions. The best wines in ancient times were largely reserved for a select few. For others, wine was rough, sour, acrid—consumed not in pursuit of some form of connoisseurship but largely because it was safer than water.

Related Content

Most wines were consumed locally, not far from where they were made. By the 18th and 19th centuries, however, some wines were identified as better than the rest and became commodities to be shipped to wherever they were in demand. Their names became famous: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, sherry, port, Madeira, Rhine wine.

In the past quarter century, this portfolio has expanded dramatically. We now live in an era that would be almost unrecognizable to wine lovers of our grandparents’ generation. Never before have so many different wines, from so many places, in so many diverse styles, been available to so many people around the globe.

Of the seven continents, only Antarctica does not have vineyards. Australia, South America, Africa, North America, and Asia have all joined in. While the wines of Argentina and Chile sell by the millions of bottles each year in the United States, wines from Uruguay and Brazil are now also appearing in stores. Israel and Lebanon, South Africa and Turkey all make good wine. And let’s not forget India, Thailand, Japan, and China, which have their own adolescent wine industries.

Closer to home, every state in the U.S. now makes wine. A lot of it is not very good, but you’d be surprised at the high quality coming from unexpected places. The Finger Lakes region of New York has taken its place as a world-class producer of Riesling. So has northern Michigan. I’ve had fine wine from Idaho and Utah and, yes, even from Texas.

In New Mexico, the Gruet winery makes excellent sparkling wine from grapes grown in the Rio Grande Valley. And speaking of sparkling wine, some terrific bottles now come from the south coast of England, where the pale calcareous soil—picture the White Cliffs of Dover—is very much like
the famous chalky terrain of
France’s Champagne region. It used to be considered too cold to make fine wine in England. But that was before climate change.

Even more exciting than the new producers of wine are the age-old areas that were little known before, but are now thrilling wine lovers everywhere. Sicily, for example, was known for making vast quantities of dull, powerful wine, often used to punch up weak vintages in France. Now the reds and whites of Mount 
Etna and the Vittoria region are superb, complex, and delicious.

The Greek island Santorini was never known for good wine. Neither were the Canary Islands of Spain. But the vibrant whites of Santorini are now a vivacious pleasure with seafood, while the reds of the Canaries are great values for smart wine lovers.

The list of historic wine localities discovered by the rest of the world in recent years goes on and on. The Jura in eastern France, with its peculiar yellow wines and pale reds, was ignored even by the French. Now its wines are prized in San Francisco, Tokyo, and New York. Few people even 10 years ago had heard of Ribeira Sacra, in western Spain, where the breathtakingly steep slopes rising from rivers were first planted with grapevines by the Romans. Now their delicious reds, made from the Mencía grape, are a worldwide delight.

Each year the discoveries continue. Some of the most exciting have happened in countries where vigorous wine cultures that had thrived for centuries were stanched by the collectivist economics of communist governments. The country of Georgia, hidden away 
in the Caucasus on the hinge between Europe and Asia, may well have been the place wine was invented several millennia ago. Today some of its best wines are still made using ancient methods and are thoroughly idiosyncratic and wonderful.

The choices can seem so vast that wine lovers today sometimes feel intimidated. It can seem easier to open a familiar Merlot, or even grab a beer. But for the adventurous spirit, the rewards of going farther afield are vast. Wine is so much more than a grocery list of flavors in a glass. It’s an invitation to explore.


The Ever Expanding World of Wine Takes Your Palate to Unexpected Places

For all of recorded history and even before, wine has been intrinsic to the lives of the Greeks, Romans, and other peoples of the Mediterranean and Caucasus regions. The best wines in ancient times were largely reserved for a select few. For others, wine was rough, sour, acrid—consumed not in pursuit of some form of connoisseurship but largely because it was safer than water.

Related Content

Most wines were consumed locally, not far from where they were made. By the 18th and 19th centuries, however, some wines were identified as better than the rest and became commodities to be shipped to wherever they were in demand. Their names became famous: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, sherry, port, Madeira, Rhine wine.

In the past quarter century, this portfolio has expanded dramatically. We now live in an era that would be almost unrecognizable to wine lovers of our grandparents’ generation. Never before have so many different wines, from so many places, in so many diverse styles, been available to so many people around the globe.

Of the seven continents, only Antarctica does not have vineyards. Australia, South America, Africa, North America, and Asia have all joined in. While the wines of Argentina and Chile sell by the millions of bottles each year in the United States, wines from Uruguay and Brazil are now also appearing in stores. Israel and Lebanon, South Africa and Turkey all make good wine. And let’s not forget India, Thailand, Japan, and China, which have their own adolescent wine industries.

Closer to home, every state in the U.S. now makes wine. A lot of it is not very good, but you’d be surprised at the high quality coming from unexpected places. The Finger Lakes region of New York has taken its place as a world-class producer of Riesling. So has northern Michigan. I’ve had fine wine from Idaho and Utah and, yes, even from Texas.

In New Mexico, the Gruet winery makes excellent sparkling wine from grapes grown in the Rio Grande Valley. And speaking of sparkling wine, some terrific bottles now come from the south coast of England, where the pale calcareous soil—picture the White Cliffs of Dover—is very much like
the famous chalky terrain of
France’s Champagne region. It used to be considered too cold to make fine wine in England. But that was before climate change.

Even more exciting than the new producers of wine are the age-old areas that were little known before, but are now thrilling wine lovers everywhere. Sicily, for example, was known for making vast quantities of dull, powerful wine, often used to punch up weak vintages in France. Now the reds and whites of Mount 
Etna and the Vittoria region are superb, complex, and delicious.

The Greek island Santorini was never known for good wine. Neither were the Canary Islands of Spain. But the vibrant whites of Santorini are now a vivacious pleasure with seafood, while the reds of the Canaries are great values for smart wine lovers.

The list of historic wine localities discovered by the rest of the world in recent years goes on and on. The Jura in eastern France, with its peculiar yellow wines and pale reds, was ignored even by the French. Now its wines are prized in San Francisco, Tokyo, and New York. Few people even 10 years ago had heard of Ribeira Sacra, in western Spain, where the breathtakingly steep slopes rising from rivers were first planted with grapevines by the Romans. Now their delicious reds, made from the Mencía grape, are a worldwide delight.

Each year the discoveries continue. Some of the most exciting have happened in countries where vigorous wine cultures that had thrived for centuries were stanched by the collectivist economics of communist governments. The country of Georgia, hidden away 
in the Caucasus on the hinge between Europe and Asia, may well have been the place wine was invented several millennia ago. Today some of its best wines are still made using ancient methods and are thoroughly idiosyncratic and wonderful.

The choices can seem so vast that wine lovers today sometimes feel intimidated. It can seem easier to open a familiar Merlot, or even grab a beer. But for the adventurous spirit, the rewards of going farther afield are vast. Wine is so much more than a grocery list of flavors in a glass. It’s an invitation to explore.


The Ever Expanding World of Wine Takes Your Palate to Unexpected Places

For all of recorded history and even before, wine has been intrinsic to the lives of the Greeks, Romans, and other peoples of the Mediterranean and Caucasus regions. The best wines in ancient times were largely reserved for a select few. For others, wine was rough, sour, acrid—consumed not in pursuit of some form of connoisseurship but largely because it was safer than water.

Related Content

Most wines were consumed locally, not far from where they were made. By the 18th and 19th centuries, however, some wines were identified as better than the rest and became commodities to be shipped to wherever they were in demand. Their names became famous: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, sherry, port, Madeira, Rhine wine.

In the past quarter century, this portfolio has expanded dramatically. We now live in an era that would be almost unrecognizable to wine lovers of our grandparents’ generation. Never before have so many different wines, from so many places, in so many diverse styles, been available to so many people around the globe.

Of the seven continents, only Antarctica does not have vineyards. Australia, South America, Africa, North America, and Asia have all joined in. While the wines of Argentina and Chile sell by the millions of bottles each year in the United States, wines from Uruguay and Brazil are now also appearing in stores. Israel and Lebanon, South Africa and Turkey all make good wine. And let’s not forget India, Thailand, Japan, and China, which have their own adolescent wine industries.

Closer to home, every state in the U.S. now makes wine. A lot of it is not very good, but you’d be surprised at the high quality coming from unexpected places. The Finger Lakes region of New York has taken its place as a world-class producer of Riesling. So has northern Michigan. I’ve had fine wine from Idaho and Utah and, yes, even from Texas.

In New Mexico, the Gruet winery makes excellent sparkling wine from grapes grown in the Rio Grande Valley. And speaking of sparkling wine, some terrific bottles now come from the south coast of England, where the pale calcareous soil—picture the White Cliffs of Dover—is very much like
the famous chalky terrain of
France’s Champagne region. It used to be considered too cold to make fine wine in England. But that was before climate change.

Even more exciting than the new producers of wine are the age-old areas that were little known before, but are now thrilling wine lovers everywhere. Sicily, for example, was known for making vast quantities of dull, powerful wine, often used to punch up weak vintages in France. Now the reds and whites of Mount 
Etna and the Vittoria region are superb, complex, and delicious.

The Greek island Santorini was never known for good wine. Neither were the Canary Islands of Spain. But the vibrant whites of Santorini are now a vivacious pleasure with seafood, while the reds of the Canaries are great values for smart wine lovers.

The list of historic wine localities discovered by the rest of the world in recent years goes on and on. The Jura in eastern France, with its peculiar yellow wines and pale reds, was ignored even by the French. Now its wines are prized in San Francisco, Tokyo, and New York. Few people even 10 years ago had heard of Ribeira Sacra, in western Spain, where the breathtakingly steep slopes rising from rivers were first planted with grapevines by the Romans. Now their delicious reds, made from the Mencía grape, are a worldwide delight.

Each year the discoveries continue. Some of the most exciting have happened in countries where vigorous wine cultures that had thrived for centuries were stanched by the collectivist economics of communist governments. The country of Georgia, hidden away 
in the Caucasus on the hinge between Europe and Asia, may well have been the place wine was invented several millennia ago. Today some of its best wines are still made using ancient methods and are thoroughly idiosyncratic and wonderful.

The choices can seem so vast that wine lovers today sometimes feel intimidated. It can seem easier to open a familiar Merlot, or even grab a beer. But for the adventurous spirit, the rewards of going farther afield are vast. Wine is so much more than a grocery list of flavors in a glass. It’s an invitation to explore.


The Ever Expanding World of Wine Takes Your Palate to Unexpected Places

For all of recorded history and even before, wine has been intrinsic to the lives of the Greeks, Romans, and other peoples of the Mediterranean and Caucasus regions. The best wines in ancient times were largely reserved for a select few. For others, wine was rough, sour, acrid—consumed not in pursuit of some form of connoisseurship but largely because it was safer than water.

Related Content

Most wines were consumed locally, not far from where they were made. By the 18th and 19th centuries, however, some wines were identified as better than the rest and became commodities to be shipped to wherever they were in demand. Their names became famous: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, sherry, port, Madeira, Rhine wine.

In the past quarter century, this portfolio has expanded dramatically. We now live in an era that would be almost unrecognizable to wine lovers of our grandparents’ generation. Never before have so many different wines, from so many places, in so many diverse styles, been available to so many people around the globe.

Of the seven continents, only Antarctica does not have vineyards. Australia, South America, Africa, North America, and Asia have all joined in. While the wines of Argentina and Chile sell by the millions of bottles each year in the United States, wines from Uruguay and Brazil are now also appearing in stores. Israel and Lebanon, South Africa and Turkey all make good wine. And let’s not forget India, Thailand, Japan, and China, which have their own adolescent wine industries.

Closer to home, every state in the U.S. now makes wine. A lot of it is not very good, but you’d be surprised at the high quality coming from unexpected places. The Finger Lakes region of New York has taken its place as a world-class producer of Riesling. So has northern Michigan. I’ve had fine wine from Idaho and Utah and, yes, even from Texas.

In New Mexico, the Gruet winery makes excellent sparkling wine from grapes grown in the Rio Grande Valley. And speaking of sparkling wine, some terrific bottles now come from the south coast of England, where the pale calcareous soil—picture the White Cliffs of Dover—is very much like
the famous chalky terrain of
France’s Champagne region. It used to be considered too cold to make fine wine in England. But that was before climate change.

Even more exciting than the new producers of wine are the age-old areas that were little known before, but are now thrilling wine lovers everywhere. Sicily, for example, was known for making vast quantities of dull, powerful wine, often used to punch up weak vintages in France. Now the reds and whites of Mount 
Etna and the Vittoria region are superb, complex, and delicious.

The Greek island Santorini was never known for good wine. Neither were the Canary Islands of Spain. But the vibrant whites of Santorini are now a vivacious pleasure with seafood, while the reds of the Canaries are great values for smart wine lovers.

The list of historic wine localities discovered by the rest of the world in recent years goes on and on. The Jura in eastern France, with its peculiar yellow wines and pale reds, was ignored even by the French. Now its wines are prized in San Francisco, Tokyo, and New York. Few people even 10 years ago had heard of Ribeira Sacra, in western Spain, where the breathtakingly steep slopes rising from rivers were first planted with grapevines by the Romans. Now their delicious reds, made from the Mencía grape, are a worldwide delight.

Each year the discoveries continue. Some of the most exciting have happened in countries where vigorous wine cultures that had thrived for centuries were stanched by the collectivist economics of communist governments. The country of Georgia, hidden away 
in the Caucasus on the hinge between Europe and Asia, may well have been the place wine was invented several millennia ago. Today some of its best wines are still made using ancient methods and are thoroughly idiosyncratic and wonderful.

The choices can seem so vast that wine lovers today sometimes feel intimidated. It can seem easier to open a familiar Merlot, or even grab a beer. But for the adventurous spirit, the rewards of going farther afield are vast. Wine is so much more than a grocery list of flavors in a glass. It’s an invitation to explore.


The Ever Expanding World of Wine Takes Your Palate to Unexpected Places

For all of recorded history and even before, wine has been intrinsic to the lives of the Greeks, Romans, and other peoples of the Mediterranean and Caucasus regions. The best wines in ancient times were largely reserved for a select few. For others, wine was rough, sour, acrid—consumed not in pursuit of some form of connoisseurship but largely because it was safer than water.

Related Content

Most wines were consumed locally, not far from where they were made. By the 18th and 19th centuries, however, some wines were identified as better than the rest and became commodities to be shipped to wherever they were in demand. Their names became famous: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, sherry, port, Madeira, Rhine wine.

In the past quarter century, this portfolio has expanded dramatically. We now live in an era that would be almost unrecognizable to wine lovers of our grandparents’ generation. Never before have so many different wines, from so many places, in so many diverse styles, been available to so many people around the globe.

Of the seven continents, only Antarctica does not have vineyards. Australia, South America, Africa, North America, and Asia have all joined in. While the wines of Argentina and Chile sell by the millions of bottles each year in the United States, wines from Uruguay and Brazil are now also appearing in stores. Israel and Lebanon, South Africa and Turkey all make good wine. And let’s not forget India, Thailand, Japan, and China, which have their own adolescent wine industries.

Closer to home, every state in the U.S. now makes wine. A lot of it is not very good, but you’d be surprised at the high quality coming from unexpected places. The Finger Lakes region of New York has taken its place as a world-class producer of Riesling. So has northern Michigan. I’ve had fine wine from Idaho and Utah and, yes, even from Texas.

In New Mexico, the Gruet winery makes excellent sparkling wine from grapes grown in the Rio Grande Valley. And speaking of sparkling wine, some terrific bottles now come from the south coast of England, where the pale calcareous soil—picture the White Cliffs of Dover—is very much like
the famous chalky terrain of
France’s Champagne region. It used to be considered too cold to make fine wine in England. But that was before climate change.

Even more exciting than the new producers of wine are the age-old areas that were little known before, but are now thrilling wine lovers everywhere. Sicily, for example, was known for making vast quantities of dull, powerful wine, often used to punch up weak vintages in France. Now the reds and whites of Mount 
Etna and the Vittoria region are superb, complex, and delicious.

The Greek island Santorini was never known for good wine. Neither were the Canary Islands of Spain. But the vibrant whites of Santorini are now a vivacious pleasure with seafood, while the reds of the Canaries are great values for smart wine lovers.

The list of historic wine localities discovered by the rest of the world in recent years goes on and on. The Jura in eastern France, with its peculiar yellow wines and pale reds, was ignored even by the French. Now its wines are prized in San Francisco, Tokyo, and New York. Few people even 10 years ago had heard of Ribeira Sacra, in western Spain, where the breathtakingly steep slopes rising from rivers were first planted with grapevines by the Romans. Now their delicious reds, made from the Mencía grape, are a worldwide delight.

Each year the discoveries continue. Some of the most exciting have happened in countries where vigorous wine cultures that had thrived for centuries were stanched by the collectivist economics of communist governments. The country of Georgia, hidden away 
in the Caucasus on the hinge between Europe and Asia, may well have been the place wine was invented several millennia ago. Today some of its best wines are still made using ancient methods and are thoroughly idiosyncratic and wonderful.

The choices can seem so vast that wine lovers today sometimes feel intimidated. It can seem easier to open a familiar Merlot, or even grab a beer. But for the adventurous spirit, the rewards of going farther afield are vast. Wine is so much more than a grocery list of flavors in a glass. It’s an invitation to explore.


The Ever Expanding World of Wine Takes Your Palate to Unexpected Places

For all of recorded history and even before, wine has been intrinsic to the lives of the Greeks, Romans, and other peoples of the Mediterranean and Caucasus regions. The best wines in ancient times were largely reserved for a select few. For others, wine was rough, sour, acrid—consumed not in pursuit of some form of connoisseurship but largely because it was safer than water.

Related Content

Most wines were consumed locally, not far from where they were made. By the 18th and 19th centuries, however, some wines were identified as better than the rest and became commodities to be shipped to wherever they were in demand. Their names became famous: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, sherry, port, Madeira, Rhine wine.

In the past quarter century, this portfolio has expanded dramatically. We now live in an era that would be almost unrecognizable to wine lovers of our grandparents’ generation. Never before have so many different wines, from so many places, in so many diverse styles, been available to so many people around the globe.

Of the seven continents, only Antarctica does not have vineyards. Australia, South America, Africa, North America, and Asia have all joined in. While the wines of Argentina and Chile sell by the millions of bottles each year in the United States, wines from Uruguay and Brazil are now also appearing in stores. Israel and Lebanon, South Africa and Turkey all make good wine. And let’s not forget India, Thailand, Japan, and China, which have their own adolescent wine industries.

Closer to home, every state in the U.S. now makes wine. A lot of it is not very good, but you’d be surprised at the high quality coming from unexpected places. The Finger Lakes region of New York has taken its place as a world-class producer of Riesling. So has northern Michigan. I’ve had fine wine from Idaho and Utah and, yes, even from Texas.

In New Mexico, the Gruet winery makes excellent sparkling wine from grapes grown in the Rio Grande Valley. And speaking of sparkling wine, some terrific bottles now come from the south coast of England, where the pale calcareous soil—picture the White Cliffs of Dover—is very much like
the famous chalky terrain of
France’s Champagne region. It used to be considered too cold to make fine wine in England. But that was before climate change.

Even more exciting than the new producers of wine are the age-old areas that were little known before, but are now thrilling wine lovers everywhere. Sicily, for example, was known for making vast quantities of dull, powerful wine, often used to punch up weak vintages in France. Now the reds and whites of Mount 
Etna and the Vittoria region are superb, complex, and delicious.

The Greek island Santorini was never known for good wine. Neither were the Canary Islands of Spain. But the vibrant whites of Santorini are now a vivacious pleasure with seafood, while the reds of the Canaries are great values for smart wine lovers.

The list of historic wine localities discovered by the rest of the world in recent years goes on and on. The Jura in eastern France, with its peculiar yellow wines and pale reds, was ignored even by the French. Now its wines are prized in San Francisco, Tokyo, and New York. Few people even 10 years ago had heard of Ribeira Sacra, in western Spain, where the breathtakingly steep slopes rising from rivers were first planted with grapevines by the Romans. Now their delicious reds, made from the Mencía grape, are a worldwide delight.

Each year the discoveries continue. Some of the most exciting have happened in countries where vigorous wine cultures that had thrived for centuries were stanched by the collectivist economics of communist governments. The country of Georgia, hidden away 
in the Caucasus on the hinge between Europe and Asia, may well have been the place wine was invented several millennia ago. Today some of its best wines are still made using ancient methods and are thoroughly idiosyncratic and wonderful.

The choices can seem so vast that wine lovers today sometimes feel intimidated. It can seem easier to open a familiar Merlot, or even grab a beer. But for the adventurous spirit, the rewards of going farther afield are vast. Wine is so much more than a grocery list of flavors in a glass. It’s an invitation to explore.


The Ever Expanding World of Wine Takes Your Palate to Unexpected Places

For all of recorded history and even before, wine has been intrinsic to the lives of the Greeks, Romans, and other peoples of the Mediterranean and Caucasus regions. The best wines in ancient times were largely reserved for a select few. For others, wine was rough, sour, acrid—consumed not in pursuit of some form of connoisseurship but largely because it was safer than water.

Related Content

Most wines were consumed locally, not far from where they were made. By the 18th and 19th centuries, however, some wines were identified as better than the rest and became commodities to be shipped to wherever they were in demand. Their names became famous: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, sherry, port, Madeira, Rhine wine.

In the past quarter century, this portfolio has expanded dramatically. We now live in an era that would be almost unrecognizable to wine lovers of our grandparents’ generation. Never before have so many different wines, from so many places, in so many diverse styles, been available to so many people around the globe.

Of the seven continents, only Antarctica does not have vineyards. Australia, South America, Africa, North America, and Asia have all joined in. While the wines of Argentina and Chile sell by the millions of bottles each year in the United States, wines from Uruguay and Brazil are now also appearing in stores. Israel and Lebanon, South Africa and Turkey all make good wine. And let’s not forget India, Thailand, Japan, and China, which have their own adolescent wine industries.

Closer to home, every state in the U.S. now makes wine. A lot of it is not very good, but you’d be surprised at the high quality coming from unexpected places. The Finger Lakes region of New York has taken its place as a world-class producer of Riesling. So has northern Michigan. I’ve had fine wine from Idaho and Utah and, yes, even from Texas.

In New Mexico, the Gruet winery makes excellent sparkling wine from grapes grown in the Rio Grande Valley. And speaking of sparkling wine, some terrific bottles now come from the south coast of England, where the pale calcareous soil—picture the White Cliffs of Dover—is very much like
the famous chalky terrain of
France’s Champagne region. It used to be considered too cold to make fine wine in England. But that was before climate change.

Even more exciting than the new producers of wine are the age-old areas that were little known before, but are now thrilling wine lovers everywhere. Sicily, for example, was known for making vast quantities of dull, powerful wine, often used to punch up weak vintages in France. Now the reds and whites of Mount 
Etna and the Vittoria region are superb, complex, and delicious.

The Greek island Santorini was never known for good wine. Neither were the Canary Islands of Spain. But the vibrant whites of Santorini are now a vivacious pleasure with seafood, while the reds of the Canaries are great values for smart wine lovers.

The list of historic wine localities discovered by the rest of the world in recent years goes on and on. The Jura in eastern France, with its peculiar yellow wines and pale reds, was ignored even by the French. Now its wines are prized in San Francisco, Tokyo, and New York. Few people even 10 years ago had heard of Ribeira Sacra, in western Spain, where the breathtakingly steep slopes rising from rivers were first planted with grapevines by the Romans. Now their delicious reds, made from the Mencía grape, are a worldwide delight.

Each year the discoveries continue. Some of the most exciting have happened in countries where vigorous wine cultures that had thrived for centuries were stanched by the collectivist economics of communist governments. The country of Georgia, hidden away 
in the Caucasus on the hinge between Europe and Asia, may well have been the place wine was invented several millennia ago. Today some of its best wines are still made using ancient methods and are thoroughly idiosyncratic and wonderful.

The choices can seem so vast that wine lovers today sometimes feel intimidated. It can seem easier to open a familiar Merlot, or even grab a beer. But for the adventurous spirit, the rewards of going farther afield are vast. Wine is so much more than a grocery list of flavors in a glass. It’s an invitation to explore.


The Ever Expanding World of Wine Takes Your Palate to Unexpected Places

For all of recorded history and even before, wine has been intrinsic to the lives of the Greeks, Romans, and other peoples of the Mediterranean and Caucasus regions. The best wines in ancient times were largely reserved for a select few. For others, wine was rough, sour, acrid—consumed not in pursuit of some form of connoisseurship but largely because it was safer than water.

Related Content

Most wines were consumed locally, not far from where they were made. By the 18th and 19th centuries, however, some wines were identified as better than the rest and became commodities to be shipped to wherever they were in demand. Their names became famous: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, sherry, port, Madeira, Rhine wine.

In the past quarter century, this portfolio has expanded dramatically. We now live in an era that would be almost unrecognizable to wine lovers of our grandparents’ generation. Never before have so many different wines, from so many places, in so many diverse styles, been available to so many people around the globe.

Of the seven continents, only Antarctica does not have vineyards. Australia, South America, Africa, North America, and Asia have all joined in. While the wines of Argentina and Chile sell by the millions of bottles each year in the United States, wines from Uruguay and Brazil are now also appearing in stores. Israel and Lebanon, South Africa and Turkey all make good wine. And let’s not forget India, Thailand, Japan, and China, which have their own adolescent wine industries.

Closer to home, every state in the U.S. now makes wine. A lot of it is not very good, but you’d be surprised at the high quality coming from unexpected places. The Finger Lakes region of New York has taken its place as a world-class producer of Riesling. So has northern Michigan. I’ve had fine wine from Idaho and Utah and, yes, even from Texas.

In New Mexico, the Gruet winery makes excellent sparkling wine from grapes grown in the Rio Grande Valley. And speaking of sparkling wine, some terrific bottles now come from the south coast of England, where the pale calcareous soil—picture the White Cliffs of Dover—is very much like
the famous chalky terrain of
France’s Champagne region. It used to be considered too cold to make fine wine in England. But that was before climate change.

Even more exciting than the new producers of wine are the age-old areas that were little known before, but are now thrilling wine lovers everywhere. Sicily, for example, was known for making vast quantities of dull, powerful wine, often used to punch up weak vintages in France. Now the reds and whites of Mount 
Etna and the Vittoria region are superb, complex, and delicious.

The Greek island Santorini was never known for good wine. Neither were the Canary Islands of Spain. But the vibrant whites of Santorini are now a vivacious pleasure with seafood, while the reds of the Canaries are great values for smart wine lovers.

The list of historic wine localities discovered by the rest of the world in recent years goes on and on. The Jura in eastern France, with its peculiar yellow wines and pale reds, was ignored even by the French. Now its wines are prized in San Francisco, Tokyo, and New York. Few people even 10 years ago had heard of Ribeira Sacra, in western Spain, where the breathtakingly steep slopes rising from rivers were first planted with grapevines by the Romans. Now their delicious reds, made from the Mencía grape, are a worldwide delight.

Each year the discoveries continue. Some of the most exciting have happened in countries where vigorous wine cultures that had thrived for centuries were stanched by the collectivist economics of communist governments. The country of Georgia, hidden away 
in the Caucasus on the hinge between Europe and Asia, may well have been the place wine was invented several millennia ago. Today some of its best wines are still made using ancient methods and are thoroughly idiosyncratic and wonderful.

The choices can seem so vast that wine lovers today sometimes feel intimidated. It can seem easier to open a familiar Merlot, or even grab a beer. But for the adventurous spirit, the rewards of going farther afield are vast. Wine is so much more than a grocery list of flavors in a glass. It’s an invitation to explore.


Watch the video: Hase Pino Allround im aktiv Radfahren-Test (May 2022).