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EAT Marketplace Sets the Pace for Farm-to-Table Dining in California’s Temecula Valley

EAT Marketplace Sets the Pace for Farm-to-Table Dining in California’s Temecula Valley


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Locally sourced food doesn’t only help the local economy, it creates amazing dishes as well

Light but filling chicken and pasta

Locally sourced food has been gaining attention for quite some time in restaurants, but when locally sourced food is paired with a passionate chef, unique dishes result. While EAT Marketplace in Temecula is in fact a marketplace offering coffees, pastries, and the like, the dishes served make this restaurant stand apart from the crowd.

We started with the roasted Brussels sprouts, and I will be honest, I have never actually enjoyed a Brussels sprout unless it was covered in cheese. Lightly seasoned and grilled, we found these completely delicious. The pasta dish I ordered was like none other with organic chicken, freshly cut pasta, and my favorite — a non-creamy sauce. My husband ordered the organic chicken and again, the dish was incredible. The chicken was robust with flavor, and the quality was so high that the chicken cut like a juicy steak; this dish is easily large enough to share.

Paleo, gluten-free and vegetarian dishes are also available, making EAT a great place to gather with friends and family because everyone will find something to enjoy. Farm-to-table menus take more care and appreciation in all aspects, so it is important to remember that when dining here. The menu is more expensive, but if you go into it knowing the locally sourced approach, the flavor and quality of the dishes will speak for themselves.


The World's 10 Best 'Table to Farm' Dining Experiences

“Farm to table” has become so ubiquitous that it’s boring. (Also, the term never really made sense to me—doesn’t all food start out on a farm and end up on a table, even if that farm is some massive corporate entity and the food is processed along the way?) Now any chef worth his or her salt is making the most of seasonal ingredients from local farmers, with minimal intervention to them.

It’s a great way to cook and to eat, and bravo to all the chefs who are cultivating relationships with nearby producers. It’s just no longer that exciting. What is exciting, though, is the growing trend of alfresco dinners in the gardens and vineyards that produced their ingredients. Call it “table to farm.”

Outstanding in the Field's Visit California Grateful Table event

This is the company that gave birth to the concept of dining on a farm as a luxury experience. Since 1999, artist Jim Denevan and his fellow organizers have aimed to create pop-up restaurants at the source of their ingredients, where guests would share a communal meal over a single long table and hear and celebrate the farmers’ story. The “culinary caravan” has hosted dinners at urban gardens, big-sky ranches and olive groves in all 50 U.S. states and 15 countries around the globe, with assists from some of the world’s most honored chefs. Upcoming dinners will be held in the American South and Southwest, Bermuda and Southern California.

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta, Portugal

For this hotel’s most intimate, immersive dining experience, 12 guests—a mix of international visitors and Portuguese regulars—gather each summer and early-autumn night around a counter in an open-air pavilion deep within the hotel’s 16,000-square-foot organic garden. Chef Tiago Santos and his deputies create a different tasting menu each day, based on which of the garden’s 300 varieties of vegetables and herbs are at their peak, as well as sustainably caught fish and pasture-fed meats from trusted local suppliers. They use only ancestral cooking methods, and fire plays a leading role.

The Chef's Garden Dinner at Rosewood Castiglion del Bosco

This Tuscan resort, which resembles a medieval village more than a traditional hotel, is also hosting intimate dinners during the month of August based on seasonal vegetables from the chef’s organic garden, as well as traditional regional dishes, enhanced by barbecue cooking.

Viceroy Snowmass's farmstead dinner

Earlier this summer, this mountain resort organized a table-to-farm dinner at Sustainable Settings, a farm in Carbondale, just down the Roaring Fork Valley from Snowmass. Given the resort’s emphasis on biking in the summer, intrepid guests rode to the site with a former Tour de France racer. It was a one-off experience could be replicated on request until the end of summer.

A bridal shower setup at Montage Laguna Beach's studio restaurant

The resort’s Forbes Five-Star restaurant, Studio, is also the site of some fantastic alfresco dining. The meals take place in Studio’s 1,000-square-foot raised-bed garden, which currently grows cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, lemon verbena, Swiss chard, shishito peppers, Valencia oranges, kumquats, figs, artichokes and edible flowers. Whatever is in season figures prominently in the gourmet vegetarian tasting menu (which is offered alongside a more traditional omnivore menu). Oh, and there are tremendous views over the Pacific.

Vineyard Dining at the Vines of Mendoza

Star chef Francis Mallmann is behind the Siete Fuegos (seven fires, a reference to the cooking methods) restaurant at this resort, so none of the meals disappoints. But while the dining room is lovely, a more memorable experience is a private dinner in the vineyards. After sampling snacks (local chacuterie and cheese) and empanadas, guests enjoy a four-course meal prepared by one of Mallmann’s deputies, using ingredients from the robust on-site gardens and paired with boutique wines from the Vines’ private vineyards. (Dinners in the garden are also possible.)

Lunch at the Pha Tad Ke Botanical Garden

Fifteen minutes by private boat from Luang Prabang, this botanical garden, the first of its kind in Laos, is also pioneering table-to-garden dining. Visitors sit in a sala amid the plants and flowers and savor a freshly made lunch using vegetables, herbs, bamboo and ginger grown in other parts of the gardens and its permaculture demonstration farm.

A far cry from the mass-market boozy restaurants in Cabo San Lucas, this cozy restaurant is set amid the organic fields and gardens of the 25-acre Flora Farms, in the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains near San José del Cabo. When Gloria Greene opened the original restaurant (in town), called Flora, it was the first organic restaurant in the area, and it soon became clear to her that if she wanted organic ingredients she would need to start her own farm. Soon she began hosting charity culinary events for the Humane Society, and the chefs from Cabo’s top resorts discovered her produce—Charlie Trotter, who was overseeing the “C” restaurant at One & Only Palmilla at the time, was the first customer for “by request” heirloom varieties. Later, Greene persuaded Trotter’s former executive chef, Guillermo Tellez, to join her team. Now the restaurant serves only what is made, grown and raised there (they ranch pork, chicken and eggs, but there’s no beef on the menu, as it’s unsustainable in Cabo’s dry climate) and have an onsite bakery for wood-fired artisan breads. Cooking classes are also on offer.

This luxury safari lodge completed it’s shamba (Swahili for vegetable garden) earlier this year. Now it offers private lunches in those gardens, under romantic towering shade trees. Guests pick their own ingredients, and the culinary team washes and readies them for the freshest possible salad.

I discovered this gem of an agritourismo during a hiking excursion set up by the nearby Monastero Santa Rosa. That hotel drips with luxury on a prime position on the Amalfi Coast the homey, simple restaurant inland drips with authenticity. The open-air dining room is set amid scenic lemon groves, and most of the food that is served is grown on the on-site gardens.

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury destinations and hotels in 97 countries (and counting). I know the difference between what’s merely expensive and what deserves its high price tag. I’m discerning but not jaded, and I appreciate the hard work that goes into crafting experiences as well as crafting luxury goods. (I’ve written about those, too.) I’ve shared that wisdom with readers of Forbes, Departures, Conde Nast Traveler, Robb Report, Afar, National Geographic Traveler, Islands, Hemispheres, Brides, Modern Bride, Luxury SpaFinder, Well + Good, and other publications. In the name of lifestyle journalism, I’ve gotten a tattoo in Bora Bora, been bitten by a massage therapist, and flown small aircraft above three continents.


The World's 10 Best 'Table to Farm' Dining Experiences

“Farm to table” has become so ubiquitous that it’s boring. (Also, the term never really made sense to me—doesn’t all food start out on a farm and end up on a table, even if that farm is some massive corporate entity and the food is processed along the way?) Now any chef worth his or her salt is making the most of seasonal ingredients from local farmers, with minimal intervention to them.

It’s a great way to cook and to eat, and bravo to all the chefs who are cultivating relationships with nearby producers. It’s just no longer that exciting. What is exciting, though, is the growing trend of alfresco dinners in the gardens and vineyards that produced their ingredients. Call it “table to farm.”

Outstanding in the Field's Visit California Grateful Table event

This is the company that gave birth to the concept of dining on a farm as a luxury experience. Since 1999, artist Jim Denevan and his fellow organizers have aimed to create pop-up restaurants at the source of their ingredients, where guests would share a communal meal over a single long table and hear and celebrate the farmers’ story. The “culinary caravan” has hosted dinners at urban gardens, big-sky ranches and olive groves in all 50 U.S. states and 15 countries around the globe, with assists from some of the world’s most honored chefs. Upcoming dinners will be held in the American South and Southwest, Bermuda and Southern California.

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta, Portugal

For this hotel’s most intimate, immersive dining experience, 12 guests—a mix of international visitors and Portuguese regulars—gather each summer and early-autumn night around a counter in an open-air pavilion deep within the hotel’s 16,000-square-foot organic garden. Chef Tiago Santos and his deputies create a different tasting menu each day, based on which of the garden’s 300 varieties of vegetables and herbs are at their peak, as well as sustainably caught fish and pasture-fed meats from trusted local suppliers. They use only ancestral cooking methods, and fire plays a leading role.

The Chef's Garden Dinner at Rosewood Castiglion del Bosco

This Tuscan resort, which resembles a medieval village more than a traditional hotel, is also hosting intimate dinners during the month of August based on seasonal vegetables from the chef’s organic garden, as well as traditional regional dishes, enhanced by barbecue cooking.

Viceroy Snowmass's farmstead dinner

Earlier this summer, this mountain resort organized a table-to-farm dinner at Sustainable Settings, a farm in Carbondale, just down the Roaring Fork Valley from Snowmass. Given the resort’s emphasis on biking in the summer, intrepid guests rode to the site with a former Tour de France racer. It was a one-off experience could be replicated on request until the end of summer.

A bridal shower setup at Montage Laguna Beach's studio restaurant

The resort’s Forbes Five-Star restaurant, Studio, is also the site of some fantastic alfresco dining. The meals take place in Studio’s 1,000-square-foot raised-bed garden, which currently grows cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, lemon verbena, Swiss chard, shishito peppers, Valencia oranges, kumquats, figs, artichokes and edible flowers. Whatever is in season figures prominently in the gourmet vegetarian tasting menu (which is offered alongside a more traditional omnivore menu). Oh, and there are tremendous views over the Pacific.

Vineyard Dining at the Vines of Mendoza

Star chef Francis Mallmann is behind the Siete Fuegos (seven fires, a reference to the cooking methods) restaurant at this resort, so none of the meals disappoints. But while the dining room is lovely, a more memorable experience is a private dinner in the vineyards. After sampling snacks (local chacuterie and cheese) and empanadas, guests enjoy a four-course meal prepared by one of Mallmann’s deputies, using ingredients from the robust on-site gardens and paired with boutique wines from the Vines’ private vineyards. (Dinners in the garden are also possible.)

Lunch at the Pha Tad Ke Botanical Garden

Fifteen minutes by private boat from Luang Prabang, this botanical garden, the first of its kind in Laos, is also pioneering table-to-garden dining. Visitors sit in a sala amid the plants and flowers and savor a freshly made lunch using vegetables, herbs, bamboo and ginger grown in other parts of the gardens and its permaculture demonstration farm.

A far cry from the mass-market boozy restaurants in Cabo San Lucas, this cozy restaurant is set amid the organic fields and gardens of the 25-acre Flora Farms, in the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains near San José del Cabo. When Gloria Greene opened the original restaurant (in town), called Flora, it was the first organic restaurant in the area, and it soon became clear to her that if she wanted organic ingredients she would need to start her own farm. Soon she began hosting charity culinary events for the Humane Society, and the chefs from Cabo’s top resorts discovered her produce—Charlie Trotter, who was overseeing the “C” restaurant at One & Only Palmilla at the time, was the first customer for “by request” heirloom varieties. Later, Greene persuaded Trotter’s former executive chef, Guillermo Tellez, to join her team. Now the restaurant serves only what is made, grown and raised there (they ranch pork, chicken and eggs, but there’s no beef on the menu, as it’s unsustainable in Cabo’s dry climate) and have an onsite bakery for wood-fired artisan breads. Cooking classes are also on offer.

This luxury safari lodge completed it’s shamba (Swahili for vegetable garden) earlier this year. Now it offers private lunches in those gardens, under romantic towering shade trees. Guests pick their own ingredients, and the culinary team washes and readies them for the freshest possible salad.

I discovered this gem of an agritourismo during a hiking excursion set up by the nearby Monastero Santa Rosa. That hotel drips with luxury on a prime position on the Amalfi Coast the homey, simple restaurant inland drips with authenticity. The open-air dining room is set amid scenic lemon groves, and most of the food that is served is grown on the on-site gardens.

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury destinations and hotels in 97 countries (and counting). I know the difference between what’s merely expensive and what deserves its high price tag. I’m discerning but not jaded, and I appreciate the hard work that goes into crafting experiences as well as crafting luxury goods. (I’ve written about those, too.) I’ve shared that wisdom with readers of Forbes, Departures, Conde Nast Traveler, Robb Report, Afar, National Geographic Traveler, Islands, Hemispheres, Brides, Modern Bride, Luxury SpaFinder, Well + Good, and other publications. In the name of lifestyle journalism, I’ve gotten a tattoo in Bora Bora, been bitten by a massage therapist, and flown small aircraft above three continents.


The World's 10 Best 'Table to Farm' Dining Experiences

“Farm to table” has become so ubiquitous that it’s boring. (Also, the term never really made sense to me—doesn’t all food start out on a farm and end up on a table, even if that farm is some massive corporate entity and the food is processed along the way?) Now any chef worth his or her salt is making the most of seasonal ingredients from local farmers, with minimal intervention to them.

It’s a great way to cook and to eat, and bravo to all the chefs who are cultivating relationships with nearby producers. It’s just no longer that exciting. What is exciting, though, is the growing trend of alfresco dinners in the gardens and vineyards that produced their ingredients. Call it “table to farm.”

Outstanding in the Field's Visit California Grateful Table event

This is the company that gave birth to the concept of dining on a farm as a luxury experience. Since 1999, artist Jim Denevan and his fellow organizers have aimed to create pop-up restaurants at the source of their ingredients, where guests would share a communal meal over a single long table and hear and celebrate the farmers’ story. The “culinary caravan” has hosted dinners at urban gardens, big-sky ranches and olive groves in all 50 U.S. states and 15 countries around the globe, with assists from some of the world’s most honored chefs. Upcoming dinners will be held in the American South and Southwest, Bermuda and Southern California.

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta, Portugal

For this hotel’s most intimate, immersive dining experience, 12 guests—a mix of international visitors and Portuguese regulars—gather each summer and early-autumn night around a counter in an open-air pavilion deep within the hotel’s 16,000-square-foot organic garden. Chef Tiago Santos and his deputies create a different tasting menu each day, based on which of the garden’s 300 varieties of vegetables and herbs are at their peak, as well as sustainably caught fish and pasture-fed meats from trusted local suppliers. They use only ancestral cooking methods, and fire plays a leading role.

The Chef's Garden Dinner at Rosewood Castiglion del Bosco

This Tuscan resort, which resembles a medieval village more than a traditional hotel, is also hosting intimate dinners during the month of August based on seasonal vegetables from the chef’s organic garden, as well as traditional regional dishes, enhanced by barbecue cooking.

Viceroy Snowmass's farmstead dinner

Earlier this summer, this mountain resort organized a table-to-farm dinner at Sustainable Settings, a farm in Carbondale, just down the Roaring Fork Valley from Snowmass. Given the resort’s emphasis on biking in the summer, intrepid guests rode to the site with a former Tour de France racer. It was a one-off experience could be replicated on request until the end of summer.

A bridal shower setup at Montage Laguna Beach's studio restaurant

The resort’s Forbes Five-Star restaurant, Studio, is also the site of some fantastic alfresco dining. The meals take place in Studio’s 1,000-square-foot raised-bed garden, which currently grows cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, lemon verbena, Swiss chard, shishito peppers, Valencia oranges, kumquats, figs, artichokes and edible flowers. Whatever is in season figures prominently in the gourmet vegetarian tasting menu (which is offered alongside a more traditional omnivore menu). Oh, and there are tremendous views over the Pacific.

Vineyard Dining at the Vines of Mendoza

Star chef Francis Mallmann is behind the Siete Fuegos (seven fires, a reference to the cooking methods) restaurant at this resort, so none of the meals disappoints. But while the dining room is lovely, a more memorable experience is a private dinner in the vineyards. After sampling snacks (local chacuterie and cheese) and empanadas, guests enjoy a four-course meal prepared by one of Mallmann’s deputies, using ingredients from the robust on-site gardens and paired with boutique wines from the Vines’ private vineyards. (Dinners in the garden are also possible.)

Lunch at the Pha Tad Ke Botanical Garden

Fifteen minutes by private boat from Luang Prabang, this botanical garden, the first of its kind in Laos, is also pioneering table-to-garden dining. Visitors sit in a sala amid the plants and flowers and savor a freshly made lunch using vegetables, herbs, bamboo and ginger grown in other parts of the gardens and its permaculture demonstration farm.

A far cry from the mass-market boozy restaurants in Cabo San Lucas, this cozy restaurant is set amid the organic fields and gardens of the 25-acre Flora Farms, in the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains near San José del Cabo. When Gloria Greene opened the original restaurant (in town), called Flora, it was the first organic restaurant in the area, and it soon became clear to her that if she wanted organic ingredients she would need to start her own farm. Soon she began hosting charity culinary events for the Humane Society, and the chefs from Cabo’s top resorts discovered her produce—Charlie Trotter, who was overseeing the “C” restaurant at One & Only Palmilla at the time, was the first customer for “by request” heirloom varieties. Later, Greene persuaded Trotter’s former executive chef, Guillermo Tellez, to join her team. Now the restaurant serves only what is made, grown and raised there (they ranch pork, chicken and eggs, but there’s no beef on the menu, as it’s unsustainable in Cabo’s dry climate) and have an onsite bakery for wood-fired artisan breads. Cooking classes are also on offer.

This luxury safari lodge completed it’s shamba (Swahili for vegetable garden) earlier this year. Now it offers private lunches in those gardens, under romantic towering shade trees. Guests pick their own ingredients, and the culinary team washes and readies them for the freshest possible salad.

I discovered this gem of an agritourismo during a hiking excursion set up by the nearby Monastero Santa Rosa. That hotel drips with luxury on a prime position on the Amalfi Coast the homey, simple restaurant inland drips with authenticity. The open-air dining room is set amid scenic lemon groves, and most of the food that is served is grown on the on-site gardens.

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury destinations and hotels in 97 countries (and counting). I know the difference between what’s merely expensive and what deserves its high price tag. I’m discerning but not jaded, and I appreciate the hard work that goes into crafting experiences as well as crafting luxury goods. (I’ve written about those, too.) I’ve shared that wisdom with readers of Forbes, Departures, Conde Nast Traveler, Robb Report, Afar, National Geographic Traveler, Islands, Hemispheres, Brides, Modern Bride, Luxury SpaFinder, Well + Good, and other publications. In the name of lifestyle journalism, I’ve gotten a tattoo in Bora Bora, been bitten by a massage therapist, and flown small aircraft above three continents.


The World's 10 Best 'Table to Farm' Dining Experiences

“Farm to table” has become so ubiquitous that it’s boring. (Also, the term never really made sense to me—doesn’t all food start out on a farm and end up on a table, even if that farm is some massive corporate entity and the food is processed along the way?) Now any chef worth his or her salt is making the most of seasonal ingredients from local farmers, with minimal intervention to them.

It’s a great way to cook and to eat, and bravo to all the chefs who are cultivating relationships with nearby producers. It’s just no longer that exciting. What is exciting, though, is the growing trend of alfresco dinners in the gardens and vineyards that produced their ingredients. Call it “table to farm.”

Outstanding in the Field's Visit California Grateful Table event

This is the company that gave birth to the concept of dining on a farm as a luxury experience. Since 1999, artist Jim Denevan and his fellow organizers have aimed to create pop-up restaurants at the source of their ingredients, where guests would share a communal meal over a single long table and hear and celebrate the farmers’ story. The “culinary caravan” has hosted dinners at urban gardens, big-sky ranches and olive groves in all 50 U.S. states and 15 countries around the globe, with assists from some of the world’s most honored chefs. Upcoming dinners will be held in the American South and Southwest, Bermuda and Southern California.

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta, Portugal

For this hotel’s most intimate, immersive dining experience, 12 guests—a mix of international visitors and Portuguese regulars—gather each summer and early-autumn night around a counter in an open-air pavilion deep within the hotel’s 16,000-square-foot organic garden. Chef Tiago Santos and his deputies create a different tasting menu each day, based on which of the garden’s 300 varieties of vegetables and herbs are at their peak, as well as sustainably caught fish and pasture-fed meats from trusted local suppliers. They use only ancestral cooking methods, and fire plays a leading role.

The Chef's Garden Dinner at Rosewood Castiglion del Bosco

This Tuscan resort, which resembles a medieval village more than a traditional hotel, is also hosting intimate dinners during the month of August based on seasonal vegetables from the chef’s organic garden, as well as traditional regional dishes, enhanced by barbecue cooking.

Viceroy Snowmass's farmstead dinner

Earlier this summer, this mountain resort organized a table-to-farm dinner at Sustainable Settings, a farm in Carbondale, just down the Roaring Fork Valley from Snowmass. Given the resort’s emphasis on biking in the summer, intrepid guests rode to the site with a former Tour de France racer. It was a one-off experience could be replicated on request until the end of summer.

A bridal shower setup at Montage Laguna Beach's studio restaurant

The resort’s Forbes Five-Star restaurant, Studio, is also the site of some fantastic alfresco dining. The meals take place in Studio’s 1,000-square-foot raised-bed garden, which currently grows cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, lemon verbena, Swiss chard, shishito peppers, Valencia oranges, kumquats, figs, artichokes and edible flowers. Whatever is in season figures prominently in the gourmet vegetarian tasting menu (which is offered alongside a more traditional omnivore menu). Oh, and there are tremendous views over the Pacific.

Vineyard Dining at the Vines of Mendoza

Star chef Francis Mallmann is behind the Siete Fuegos (seven fires, a reference to the cooking methods) restaurant at this resort, so none of the meals disappoints. But while the dining room is lovely, a more memorable experience is a private dinner in the vineyards. After sampling snacks (local chacuterie and cheese) and empanadas, guests enjoy a four-course meal prepared by one of Mallmann’s deputies, using ingredients from the robust on-site gardens and paired with boutique wines from the Vines’ private vineyards. (Dinners in the garden are also possible.)

Lunch at the Pha Tad Ke Botanical Garden

Fifteen minutes by private boat from Luang Prabang, this botanical garden, the first of its kind in Laos, is also pioneering table-to-garden dining. Visitors sit in a sala amid the plants and flowers and savor a freshly made lunch using vegetables, herbs, bamboo and ginger grown in other parts of the gardens and its permaculture demonstration farm.

A far cry from the mass-market boozy restaurants in Cabo San Lucas, this cozy restaurant is set amid the organic fields and gardens of the 25-acre Flora Farms, in the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains near San José del Cabo. When Gloria Greene opened the original restaurant (in town), called Flora, it was the first organic restaurant in the area, and it soon became clear to her that if she wanted organic ingredients she would need to start her own farm. Soon she began hosting charity culinary events for the Humane Society, and the chefs from Cabo’s top resorts discovered her produce—Charlie Trotter, who was overseeing the “C” restaurant at One & Only Palmilla at the time, was the first customer for “by request” heirloom varieties. Later, Greene persuaded Trotter’s former executive chef, Guillermo Tellez, to join her team. Now the restaurant serves only what is made, grown and raised there (they ranch pork, chicken and eggs, but there’s no beef on the menu, as it’s unsustainable in Cabo’s dry climate) and have an onsite bakery for wood-fired artisan breads. Cooking classes are also on offer.

This luxury safari lodge completed it’s shamba (Swahili for vegetable garden) earlier this year. Now it offers private lunches in those gardens, under romantic towering shade trees. Guests pick their own ingredients, and the culinary team washes and readies them for the freshest possible salad.

I discovered this gem of an agritourismo during a hiking excursion set up by the nearby Monastero Santa Rosa. That hotel drips with luxury on a prime position on the Amalfi Coast the homey, simple restaurant inland drips with authenticity. The open-air dining room is set amid scenic lemon groves, and most of the food that is served is grown on the on-site gardens.

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury destinations and hotels in 97 countries (and counting). I know the difference between what’s merely expensive and what deserves its high price tag. I’m discerning but not jaded, and I appreciate the hard work that goes into crafting experiences as well as crafting luxury goods. (I’ve written about those, too.) I’ve shared that wisdom with readers of Forbes, Departures, Conde Nast Traveler, Robb Report, Afar, National Geographic Traveler, Islands, Hemispheres, Brides, Modern Bride, Luxury SpaFinder, Well + Good, and other publications. In the name of lifestyle journalism, I’ve gotten a tattoo in Bora Bora, been bitten by a massage therapist, and flown small aircraft above three continents.


The World's 10 Best 'Table to Farm' Dining Experiences

“Farm to table” has become so ubiquitous that it’s boring. (Also, the term never really made sense to me—doesn’t all food start out on a farm and end up on a table, even if that farm is some massive corporate entity and the food is processed along the way?) Now any chef worth his or her salt is making the most of seasonal ingredients from local farmers, with minimal intervention to them.

It’s a great way to cook and to eat, and bravo to all the chefs who are cultivating relationships with nearby producers. It’s just no longer that exciting. What is exciting, though, is the growing trend of alfresco dinners in the gardens and vineyards that produced their ingredients. Call it “table to farm.”

Outstanding in the Field's Visit California Grateful Table event

This is the company that gave birth to the concept of dining on a farm as a luxury experience. Since 1999, artist Jim Denevan and his fellow organizers have aimed to create pop-up restaurants at the source of their ingredients, where guests would share a communal meal over a single long table and hear and celebrate the farmers’ story. The “culinary caravan” has hosted dinners at urban gardens, big-sky ranches and olive groves in all 50 U.S. states and 15 countries around the globe, with assists from some of the world’s most honored chefs. Upcoming dinners will be held in the American South and Southwest, Bermuda and Southern California.

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta, Portugal

For this hotel’s most intimate, immersive dining experience, 12 guests—a mix of international visitors and Portuguese regulars—gather each summer and early-autumn night around a counter in an open-air pavilion deep within the hotel’s 16,000-square-foot organic garden. Chef Tiago Santos and his deputies create a different tasting menu each day, based on which of the garden’s 300 varieties of vegetables and herbs are at their peak, as well as sustainably caught fish and pasture-fed meats from trusted local suppliers. They use only ancestral cooking methods, and fire plays a leading role.

The Chef's Garden Dinner at Rosewood Castiglion del Bosco

This Tuscan resort, which resembles a medieval village more than a traditional hotel, is also hosting intimate dinners during the month of August based on seasonal vegetables from the chef’s organic garden, as well as traditional regional dishes, enhanced by barbecue cooking.

Viceroy Snowmass's farmstead dinner

Earlier this summer, this mountain resort organized a table-to-farm dinner at Sustainable Settings, a farm in Carbondale, just down the Roaring Fork Valley from Snowmass. Given the resort’s emphasis on biking in the summer, intrepid guests rode to the site with a former Tour de France racer. It was a one-off experience could be replicated on request until the end of summer.

A bridal shower setup at Montage Laguna Beach's studio restaurant

The resort’s Forbes Five-Star restaurant, Studio, is also the site of some fantastic alfresco dining. The meals take place in Studio’s 1,000-square-foot raised-bed garden, which currently grows cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, lemon verbena, Swiss chard, shishito peppers, Valencia oranges, kumquats, figs, artichokes and edible flowers. Whatever is in season figures prominently in the gourmet vegetarian tasting menu (which is offered alongside a more traditional omnivore menu). Oh, and there are tremendous views over the Pacific.

Vineyard Dining at the Vines of Mendoza

Star chef Francis Mallmann is behind the Siete Fuegos (seven fires, a reference to the cooking methods) restaurant at this resort, so none of the meals disappoints. But while the dining room is lovely, a more memorable experience is a private dinner in the vineyards. After sampling snacks (local chacuterie and cheese) and empanadas, guests enjoy a four-course meal prepared by one of Mallmann’s deputies, using ingredients from the robust on-site gardens and paired with boutique wines from the Vines’ private vineyards. (Dinners in the garden are also possible.)

Lunch at the Pha Tad Ke Botanical Garden

Fifteen minutes by private boat from Luang Prabang, this botanical garden, the first of its kind in Laos, is also pioneering table-to-garden dining. Visitors sit in a sala amid the plants and flowers and savor a freshly made lunch using vegetables, herbs, bamboo and ginger grown in other parts of the gardens and its permaculture demonstration farm.

A far cry from the mass-market boozy restaurants in Cabo San Lucas, this cozy restaurant is set amid the organic fields and gardens of the 25-acre Flora Farms, in the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains near San José del Cabo. When Gloria Greene opened the original restaurant (in town), called Flora, it was the first organic restaurant in the area, and it soon became clear to her that if she wanted organic ingredients she would need to start her own farm. Soon she began hosting charity culinary events for the Humane Society, and the chefs from Cabo’s top resorts discovered her produce—Charlie Trotter, who was overseeing the “C” restaurant at One & Only Palmilla at the time, was the first customer for “by request” heirloom varieties. Later, Greene persuaded Trotter’s former executive chef, Guillermo Tellez, to join her team. Now the restaurant serves only what is made, grown and raised there (they ranch pork, chicken and eggs, but there’s no beef on the menu, as it’s unsustainable in Cabo’s dry climate) and have an onsite bakery for wood-fired artisan breads. Cooking classes are also on offer.

This luxury safari lodge completed it’s shamba (Swahili for vegetable garden) earlier this year. Now it offers private lunches in those gardens, under romantic towering shade trees. Guests pick their own ingredients, and the culinary team washes and readies them for the freshest possible salad.

I discovered this gem of an agritourismo during a hiking excursion set up by the nearby Monastero Santa Rosa. That hotel drips with luxury on a prime position on the Amalfi Coast the homey, simple restaurant inland drips with authenticity. The open-air dining room is set amid scenic lemon groves, and most of the food that is served is grown on the on-site gardens.

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury destinations and hotels in 97 countries (and counting). I know the difference between what’s merely expensive and what deserves its high price tag. I’m discerning but not jaded, and I appreciate the hard work that goes into crafting experiences as well as crafting luxury goods. (I’ve written about those, too.) I’ve shared that wisdom with readers of Forbes, Departures, Conde Nast Traveler, Robb Report, Afar, National Geographic Traveler, Islands, Hemispheres, Brides, Modern Bride, Luxury SpaFinder, Well + Good, and other publications. In the name of lifestyle journalism, I’ve gotten a tattoo in Bora Bora, been bitten by a massage therapist, and flown small aircraft above three continents.


The World's 10 Best 'Table to Farm' Dining Experiences

“Farm to table” has become so ubiquitous that it’s boring. (Also, the term never really made sense to me—doesn’t all food start out on a farm and end up on a table, even if that farm is some massive corporate entity and the food is processed along the way?) Now any chef worth his or her salt is making the most of seasonal ingredients from local farmers, with minimal intervention to them.

It’s a great way to cook and to eat, and bravo to all the chefs who are cultivating relationships with nearby producers. It’s just no longer that exciting. What is exciting, though, is the growing trend of alfresco dinners in the gardens and vineyards that produced their ingredients. Call it “table to farm.”

Outstanding in the Field's Visit California Grateful Table event

This is the company that gave birth to the concept of dining on a farm as a luxury experience. Since 1999, artist Jim Denevan and his fellow organizers have aimed to create pop-up restaurants at the source of their ingredients, where guests would share a communal meal over a single long table and hear and celebrate the farmers’ story. The “culinary caravan” has hosted dinners at urban gardens, big-sky ranches and olive groves in all 50 U.S. states and 15 countries around the globe, with assists from some of the world’s most honored chefs. Upcoming dinners will be held in the American South and Southwest, Bermuda and Southern California.

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta, Portugal

For this hotel’s most intimate, immersive dining experience, 12 guests—a mix of international visitors and Portuguese regulars—gather each summer and early-autumn night around a counter in an open-air pavilion deep within the hotel’s 16,000-square-foot organic garden. Chef Tiago Santos and his deputies create a different tasting menu each day, based on which of the garden’s 300 varieties of vegetables and herbs are at their peak, as well as sustainably caught fish and pasture-fed meats from trusted local suppliers. They use only ancestral cooking methods, and fire plays a leading role.

The Chef's Garden Dinner at Rosewood Castiglion del Bosco

This Tuscan resort, which resembles a medieval village more than a traditional hotel, is also hosting intimate dinners during the month of August based on seasonal vegetables from the chef’s organic garden, as well as traditional regional dishes, enhanced by barbecue cooking.

Viceroy Snowmass's farmstead dinner

Earlier this summer, this mountain resort organized a table-to-farm dinner at Sustainable Settings, a farm in Carbondale, just down the Roaring Fork Valley from Snowmass. Given the resort’s emphasis on biking in the summer, intrepid guests rode to the site with a former Tour de France racer. It was a one-off experience could be replicated on request until the end of summer.

A bridal shower setup at Montage Laguna Beach's studio restaurant

The resort’s Forbes Five-Star restaurant, Studio, is also the site of some fantastic alfresco dining. The meals take place in Studio’s 1,000-square-foot raised-bed garden, which currently grows cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, lemon verbena, Swiss chard, shishito peppers, Valencia oranges, kumquats, figs, artichokes and edible flowers. Whatever is in season figures prominently in the gourmet vegetarian tasting menu (which is offered alongside a more traditional omnivore menu). Oh, and there are tremendous views over the Pacific.

Vineyard Dining at the Vines of Mendoza

Star chef Francis Mallmann is behind the Siete Fuegos (seven fires, a reference to the cooking methods) restaurant at this resort, so none of the meals disappoints. But while the dining room is lovely, a more memorable experience is a private dinner in the vineyards. After sampling snacks (local chacuterie and cheese) and empanadas, guests enjoy a four-course meal prepared by one of Mallmann’s deputies, using ingredients from the robust on-site gardens and paired with boutique wines from the Vines’ private vineyards. (Dinners in the garden are also possible.)

Lunch at the Pha Tad Ke Botanical Garden

Fifteen minutes by private boat from Luang Prabang, this botanical garden, the first of its kind in Laos, is also pioneering table-to-garden dining. Visitors sit in a sala amid the plants and flowers and savor a freshly made lunch using vegetables, herbs, bamboo and ginger grown in other parts of the gardens and its permaculture demonstration farm.

A far cry from the mass-market boozy restaurants in Cabo San Lucas, this cozy restaurant is set amid the organic fields and gardens of the 25-acre Flora Farms, in the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains near San José del Cabo. When Gloria Greene opened the original restaurant (in town), called Flora, it was the first organic restaurant in the area, and it soon became clear to her that if she wanted organic ingredients she would need to start her own farm. Soon she began hosting charity culinary events for the Humane Society, and the chefs from Cabo’s top resorts discovered her produce—Charlie Trotter, who was overseeing the “C” restaurant at One & Only Palmilla at the time, was the first customer for “by request” heirloom varieties. Later, Greene persuaded Trotter’s former executive chef, Guillermo Tellez, to join her team. Now the restaurant serves only what is made, grown and raised there (they ranch pork, chicken and eggs, but there’s no beef on the menu, as it’s unsustainable in Cabo’s dry climate) and have an onsite bakery for wood-fired artisan breads. Cooking classes are also on offer.

This luxury safari lodge completed it’s shamba (Swahili for vegetable garden) earlier this year. Now it offers private lunches in those gardens, under romantic towering shade trees. Guests pick their own ingredients, and the culinary team washes and readies them for the freshest possible salad.

I discovered this gem of an agritourismo during a hiking excursion set up by the nearby Monastero Santa Rosa. That hotel drips with luxury on a prime position on the Amalfi Coast the homey, simple restaurant inland drips with authenticity. The open-air dining room is set amid scenic lemon groves, and most of the food that is served is grown on the on-site gardens.

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury destinations and hotels in 97 countries (and counting). I know the difference between what’s merely expensive and what deserves its high price tag. I’m discerning but not jaded, and I appreciate the hard work that goes into crafting experiences as well as crafting luxury goods. (I’ve written about those, too.) I’ve shared that wisdom with readers of Forbes, Departures, Conde Nast Traveler, Robb Report, Afar, National Geographic Traveler, Islands, Hemispheres, Brides, Modern Bride, Luxury SpaFinder, Well + Good, and other publications. In the name of lifestyle journalism, I’ve gotten a tattoo in Bora Bora, been bitten by a massage therapist, and flown small aircraft above three continents.


The World's 10 Best 'Table to Farm' Dining Experiences

“Farm to table” has become so ubiquitous that it’s boring. (Also, the term never really made sense to me—doesn’t all food start out on a farm and end up on a table, even if that farm is some massive corporate entity and the food is processed along the way?) Now any chef worth his or her salt is making the most of seasonal ingredients from local farmers, with minimal intervention to them.

It’s a great way to cook and to eat, and bravo to all the chefs who are cultivating relationships with nearby producers. It’s just no longer that exciting. What is exciting, though, is the growing trend of alfresco dinners in the gardens and vineyards that produced their ingredients. Call it “table to farm.”

Outstanding in the Field's Visit California Grateful Table event

This is the company that gave birth to the concept of dining on a farm as a luxury experience. Since 1999, artist Jim Denevan and his fellow organizers have aimed to create pop-up restaurants at the source of their ingredients, where guests would share a communal meal over a single long table and hear and celebrate the farmers’ story. The “culinary caravan” has hosted dinners at urban gardens, big-sky ranches and olive groves in all 50 U.S. states and 15 countries around the globe, with assists from some of the world’s most honored chefs. Upcoming dinners will be held in the American South and Southwest, Bermuda and Southern California.

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta, Portugal

For this hotel’s most intimate, immersive dining experience, 12 guests—a mix of international visitors and Portuguese regulars—gather each summer and early-autumn night around a counter in an open-air pavilion deep within the hotel’s 16,000-square-foot organic garden. Chef Tiago Santos and his deputies create a different tasting menu each day, based on which of the garden’s 300 varieties of vegetables and herbs are at their peak, as well as sustainably caught fish and pasture-fed meats from trusted local suppliers. They use only ancestral cooking methods, and fire plays a leading role.

The Chef's Garden Dinner at Rosewood Castiglion del Bosco

This Tuscan resort, which resembles a medieval village more than a traditional hotel, is also hosting intimate dinners during the month of August based on seasonal vegetables from the chef’s organic garden, as well as traditional regional dishes, enhanced by barbecue cooking.

Viceroy Snowmass's farmstead dinner

Earlier this summer, this mountain resort organized a table-to-farm dinner at Sustainable Settings, a farm in Carbondale, just down the Roaring Fork Valley from Snowmass. Given the resort’s emphasis on biking in the summer, intrepid guests rode to the site with a former Tour de France racer. It was a one-off experience could be replicated on request until the end of summer.

A bridal shower setup at Montage Laguna Beach's studio restaurant

The resort’s Forbes Five-Star restaurant, Studio, is also the site of some fantastic alfresco dining. The meals take place in Studio’s 1,000-square-foot raised-bed garden, which currently grows cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, lemon verbena, Swiss chard, shishito peppers, Valencia oranges, kumquats, figs, artichokes and edible flowers. Whatever is in season figures prominently in the gourmet vegetarian tasting menu (which is offered alongside a more traditional omnivore menu). Oh, and there are tremendous views over the Pacific.

Vineyard Dining at the Vines of Mendoza

Star chef Francis Mallmann is behind the Siete Fuegos (seven fires, a reference to the cooking methods) restaurant at this resort, so none of the meals disappoints. But while the dining room is lovely, a more memorable experience is a private dinner in the vineyards. After sampling snacks (local chacuterie and cheese) and empanadas, guests enjoy a four-course meal prepared by one of Mallmann’s deputies, using ingredients from the robust on-site gardens and paired with boutique wines from the Vines’ private vineyards. (Dinners in the garden are also possible.)

Lunch at the Pha Tad Ke Botanical Garden

Fifteen minutes by private boat from Luang Prabang, this botanical garden, the first of its kind in Laos, is also pioneering table-to-garden dining. Visitors sit in a sala amid the plants and flowers and savor a freshly made lunch using vegetables, herbs, bamboo and ginger grown in other parts of the gardens and its permaculture demonstration farm.

A far cry from the mass-market boozy restaurants in Cabo San Lucas, this cozy restaurant is set amid the organic fields and gardens of the 25-acre Flora Farms, in the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains near San José del Cabo. When Gloria Greene opened the original restaurant (in town), called Flora, it was the first organic restaurant in the area, and it soon became clear to her that if she wanted organic ingredients she would need to start her own farm. Soon she began hosting charity culinary events for the Humane Society, and the chefs from Cabo’s top resorts discovered her produce—Charlie Trotter, who was overseeing the “C” restaurant at One & Only Palmilla at the time, was the first customer for “by request” heirloom varieties. Later, Greene persuaded Trotter’s former executive chef, Guillermo Tellez, to join her team. Now the restaurant serves only what is made, grown and raised there (they ranch pork, chicken and eggs, but there’s no beef on the menu, as it’s unsustainable in Cabo’s dry climate) and have an onsite bakery for wood-fired artisan breads. Cooking classes are also on offer.

This luxury safari lodge completed it’s shamba (Swahili for vegetable garden) earlier this year. Now it offers private lunches in those gardens, under romantic towering shade trees. Guests pick their own ingredients, and the culinary team washes and readies them for the freshest possible salad.

I discovered this gem of an agritourismo during a hiking excursion set up by the nearby Monastero Santa Rosa. That hotel drips with luxury on a prime position on the Amalfi Coast the homey, simple restaurant inland drips with authenticity. The open-air dining room is set amid scenic lemon groves, and most of the food that is served is grown on the on-site gardens.

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury destinations and hotels in 97 countries (and counting). I know the difference between what’s merely expensive and what deserves its high price tag. I’m discerning but not jaded, and I appreciate the hard work that goes into crafting experiences as well as crafting luxury goods. (I’ve written about those, too.) I’ve shared that wisdom with readers of Forbes, Departures, Conde Nast Traveler, Robb Report, Afar, National Geographic Traveler, Islands, Hemispheres, Brides, Modern Bride, Luxury SpaFinder, Well + Good, and other publications. In the name of lifestyle journalism, I’ve gotten a tattoo in Bora Bora, been bitten by a massage therapist, and flown small aircraft above three continents.


The World's 10 Best 'Table to Farm' Dining Experiences

“Farm to table” has become so ubiquitous that it’s boring. (Also, the term never really made sense to me—doesn’t all food start out on a farm and end up on a table, even if that farm is some massive corporate entity and the food is processed along the way?) Now any chef worth his or her salt is making the most of seasonal ingredients from local farmers, with minimal intervention to them.

It’s a great way to cook and to eat, and bravo to all the chefs who are cultivating relationships with nearby producers. It’s just no longer that exciting. What is exciting, though, is the growing trend of alfresco dinners in the gardens and vineyards that produced their ingredients. Call it “table to farm.”

Outstanding in the Field's Visit California Grateful Table event

This is the company that gave birth to the concept of dining on a farm as a luxury experience. Since 1999, artist Jim Denevan and his fellow organizers have aimed to create pop-up restaurants at the source of their ingredients, where guests would share a communal meal over a single long table and hear and celebrate the farmers’ story. The “culinary caravan” has hosted dinners at urban gardens, big-sky ranches and olive groves in all 50 U.S. states and 15 countries around the globe, with assists from some of the world’s most honored chefs. Upcoming dinners will be held in the American South and Southwest, Bermuda and Southern California.

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta, Portugal

For this hotel’s most intimate, immersive dining experience, 12 guests—a mix of international visitors and Portuguese regulars—gather each summer and early-autumn night around a counter in an open-air pavilion deep within the hotel’s 16,000-square-foot organic garden. Chef Tiago Santos and his deputies create a different tasting menu each day, based on which of the garden’s 300 varieties of vegetables and herbs are at their peak, as well as sustainably caught fish and pasture-fed meats from trusted local suppliers. They use only ancestral cooking methods, and fire plays a leading role.

The Chef's Garden Dinner at Rosewood Castiglion del Bosco

This Tuscan resort, which resembles a medieval village more than a traditional hotel, is also hosting intimate dinners during the month of August based on seasonal vegetables from the chef’s organic garden, as well as traditional regional dishes, enhanced by barbecue cooking.

Viceroy Snowmass's farmstead dinner

Earlier this summer, this mountain resort organized a table-to-farm dinner at Sustainable Settings, a farm in Carbondale, just down the Roaring Fork Valley from Snowmass. Given the resort’s emphasis on biking in the summer, intrepid guests rode to the site with a former Tour de France racer. It was a one-off experience could be replicated on request until the end of summer.

A bridal shower setup at Montage Laguna Beach's studio restaurant

The resort’s Forbes Five-Star restaurant, Studio, is also the site of some fantastic alfresco dining. The meals take place in Studio’s 1,000-square-foot raised-bed garden, which currently grows cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, lemon verbena, Swiss chard, shishito peppers, Valencia oranges, kumquats, figs, artichokes and edible flowers. Whatever is in season figures prominently in the gourmet vegetarian tasting menu (which is offered alongside a more traditional omnivore menu). Oh, and there are tremendous views over the Pacific.

Vineyard Dining at the Vines of Mendoza

Star chef Francis Mallmann is behind the Siete Fuegos (seven fires, a reference to the cooking methods) restaurant at this resort, so none of the meals disappoints. But while the dining room is lovely, a more memorable experience is a private dinner in the vineyards. After sampling snacks (local chacuterie and cheese) and empanadas, guests enjoy a four-course meal prepared by one of Mallmann’s deputies, using ingredients from the robust on-site gardens and paired with boutique wines from the Vines’ private vineyards. (Dinners in the garden are also possible.)

Lunch at the Pha Tad Ke Botanical Garden

Fifteen minutes by private boat from Luang Prabang, this botanical garden, the first of its kind in Laos, is also pioneering table-to-garden dining. Visitors sit in a sala amid the plants and flowers and savor a freshly made lunch using vegetables, herbs, bamboo and ginger grown in other parts of the gardens and its permaculture demonstration farm.

A far cry from the mass-market boozy restaurants in Cabo San Lucas, this cozy restaurant is set amid the organic fields and gardens of the 25-acre Flora Farms, in the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains near San José del Cabo. When Gloria Greene opened the original restaurant (in town), called Flora, it was the first organic restaurant in the area, and it soon became clear to her that if she wanted organic ingredients she would need to start her own farm. Soon she began hosting charity culinary events for the Humane Society, and the chefs from Cabo’s top resorts discovered her produce—Charlie Trotter, who was overseeing the “C” restaurant at One & Only Palmilla at the time, was the first customer for “by request” heirloom varieties. Later, Greene persuaded Trotter’s former executive chef, Guillermo Tellez, to join her team. Now the restaurant serves only what is made, grown and raised there (they ranch pork, chicken and eggs, but there’s no beef on the menu, as it’s unsustainable in Cabo’s dry climate) and have an onsite bakery for wood-fired artisan breads. Cooking classes are also on offer.

This luxury safari lodge completed it’s shamba (Swahili for vegetable garden) earlier this year. Now it offers private lunches in those gardens, under romantic towering shade trees. Guests pick their own ingredients, and the culinary team washes and readies them for the freshest possible salad.

I discovered this gem of an agritourismo during a hiking excursion set up by the nearby Monastero Santa Rosa. That hotel drips with luxury on a prime position on the Amalfi Coast the homey, simple restaurant inland drips with authenticity. The open-air dining room is set amid scenic lemon groves, and most of the food that is served is grown on the on-site gardens.

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury destinations and hotels in 97 countries (and counting). I know the difference between what’s merely expensive and what deserves its high price tag. I’m discerning but not jaded, and I appreciate the hard work that goes into crafting experiences as well as crafting luxury goods. (I’ve written about those, too.) I’ve shared that wisdom with readers of Forbes, Departures, Conde Nast Traveler, Robb Report, Afar, National Geographic Traveler, Islands, Hemispheres, Brides, Modern Bride, Luxury SpaFinder, Well + Good, and other publications. In the name of lifestyle journalism, I’ve gotten a tattoo in Bora Bora, been bitten by a massage therapist, and flown small aircraft above three continents.


The World's 10 Best 'Table to Farm' Dining Experiences

“Farm to table” has become so ubiquitous that it’s boring. (Also, the term never really made sense to me—doesn’t all food start out on a farm and end up on a table, even if that farm is some massive corporate entity and the food is processed along the way?) Now any chef worth his or her salt is making the most of seasonal ingredients from local farmers, with minimal intervention to them.

It’s a great way to cook and to eat, and bravo to all the chefs who are cultivating relationships with nearby producers. It’s just no longer that exciting. What is exciting, though, is the growing trend of alfresco dinners in the gardens and vineyards that produced their ingredients. Call it “table to farm.”

Outstanding in the Field's Visit California Grateful Table event

This is the company that gave birth to the concept of dining on a farm as a luxury experience. Since 1999, artist Jim Denevan and his fellow organizers have aimed to create pop-up restaurants at the source of their ingredients, where guests would share a communal meal over a single long table and hear and celebrate the farmers’ story. The “culinary caravan” has hosted dinners at urban gardens, big-sky ranches and olive groves in all 50 U.S. states and 15 countries around the globe, with assists from some of the world’s most honored chefs. Upcoming dinners will be held in the American South and Southwest, Bermuda and Southern California.

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta, Portugal

For this hotel’s most intimate, immersive dining experience, 12 guests—a mix of international visitors and Portuguese regulars—gather each summer and early-autumn night around a counter in an open-air pavilion deep within the hotel’s 16,000-square-foot organic garden. Chef Tiago Santos and his deputies create a different tasting menu each day, based on which of the garden’s 300 varieties of vegetables and herbs are at their peak, as well as sustainably caught fish and pasture-fed meats from trusted local suppliers. They use only ancestral cooking methods, and fire plays a leading role.

The Chef's Garden Dinner at Rosewood Castiglion del Bosco

This Tuscan resort, which resembles a medieval village more than a traditional hotel, is also hosting intimate dinners during the month of August based on seasonal vegetables from the chef’s organic garden, as well as traditional regional dishes, enhanced by barbecue cooking.

Viceroy Snowmass's farmstead dinner

Earlier this summer, this mountain resort organized a table-to-farm dinner at Sustainable Settings, a farm in Carbondale, just down the Roaring Fork Valley from Snowmass. Given the resort’s emphasis on biking in the summer, intrepid guests rode to the site with a former Tour de France racer. It was a one-off experience could be replicated on request until the end of summer.

A bridal shower setup at Montage Laguna Beach's studio restaurant

The resort’s Forbes Five-Star restaurant, Studio, is also the site of some fantastic alfresco dining. The meals take place in Studio’s 1,000-square-foot raised-bed garden, which currently grows cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, lemon verbena, Swiss chard, shishito peppers, Valencia oranges, kumquats, figs, artichokes and edible flowers. Whatever is in season figures prominently in the gourmet vegetarian tasting menu (which is offered alongside a more traditional omnivore menu). Oh, and there are tremendous views over the Pacific.

Vineyard Dining at the Vines of Mendoza

Star chef Francis Mallmann is behind the Siete Fuegos (seven fires, a reference to the cooking methods) restaurant at this resort, so none of the meals disappoints. But while the dining room is lovely, a more memorable experience is a private dinner in the vineyards. After sampling snacks (local chacuterie and cheese) and empanadas, guests enjoy a four-course meal prepared by one of Mallmann’s deputies, using ingredients from the robust on-site gardens and paired with boutique wines from the Vines’ private vineyards. (Dinners in the garden are also possible.)

Lunch at the Pha Tad Ke Botanical Garden

Fifteen minutes by private boat from Luang Prabang, this botanical garden, the first of its kind in Laos, is also pioneering table-to-garden dining. Visitors sit in a sala amid the plants and flowers and savor a freshly made lunch using vegetables, herbs, bamboo and ginger grown in other parts of the gardens and its permaculture demonstration farm.

A far cry from the mass-market boozy restaurants in Cabo San Lucas, this cozy restaurant is set amid the organic fields and gardens of the 25-acre Flora Farms, in the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains near San José del Cabo. When Gloria Greene opened the original restaurant (in town), called Flora, it was the first organic restaurant in the area, and it soon became clear to her that if she wanted organic ingredients she would need to start her own farm. Soon she began hosting charity culinary events for the Humane Society, and the chefs from Cabo’s top resorts discovered her produce—Charlie Trotter, who was overseeing the “C” restaurant at One & Only Palmilla at the time, was the first customer for “by request” heirloom varieties. Later, Greene persuaded Trotter’s former executive chef, Guillermo Tellez, to join her team. Now the restaurant serves only what is made, grown and raised there (they ranch pork, chicken and eggs, but there’s no beef on the menu, as it’s unsustainable in Cabo’s dry climate) and have an onsite bakery for wood-fired artisan breads. Cooking classes are also on offer.

This luxury safari lodge completed it’s shamba (Swahili for vegetable garden) earlier this year. Now it offers private lunches in those gardens, under romantic towering shade trees. Guests pick their own ingredients, and the culinary team washes and readies them for the freshest possible salad.

I discovered this gem of an agritourismo during a hiking excursion set up by the nearby Monastero Santa Rosa. That hotel drips with luxury on a prime position on the Amalfi Coast the homey, simple restaurant inland drips with authenticity. The open-air dining room is set amid scenic lemon groves, and most of the food that is served is grown on the on-site gardens.

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury destinations and hotels in 97 countries (and counting). I know the difference between what’s merely expensive and what deserves its high price tag. I’m discerning but not jaded, and I appreciate the hard work that goes into crafting experiences as well as crafting luxury goods. (I’ve written about those, too.) I’ve shared that wisdom with readers of Forbes, Departures, Conde Nast Traveler, Robb Report, Afar, National Geographic Traveler, Islands, Hemispheres, Brides, Modern Bride, Luxury SpaFinder, Well + Good, and other publications. In the name of lifestyle journalism, I’ve gotten a tattoo in Bora Bora, been bitten by a massage therapist, and flown small aircraft above three continents.


The World's 10 Best 'Table to Farm' Dining Experiences

“Farm to table” has become so ubiquitous that it’s boring. (Also, the term never really made sense to me—doesn’t all food start out on a farm and end up on a table, even if that farm is some massive corporate entity and the food is processed along the way?) Now any chef worth his or her salt is making the most of seasonal ingredients from local farmers, with minimal intervention to them.

It’s a great way to cook and to eat, and bravo to all the chefs who are cultivating relationships with nearby producers. It’s just no longer that exciting. What is exciting, though, is the growing trend of alfresco dinners in the gardens and vineyards that produced their ingredients. Call it “table to farm.”

Outstanding in the Field's Visit California Grateful Table event

This is the company that gave birth to the concept of dining on a farm as a luxury experience. Since 1999, artist Jim Denevan and his fellow organizers have aimed to create pop-up restaurants at the source of their ingredients, where guests would share a communal meal over a single long table and hear and celebrate the farmers’ story. The “culinary caravan” has hosted dinners at urban gardens, big-sky ranches and olive groves in all 50 U.S. states and 15 countries around the globe, with assists from some of the world’s most honored chefs. Upcoming dinners will be held in the American South and Southwest, Bermuda and Southern California.

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta

Food Circle at Sublime Comporta, Portugal

For this hotel’s most intimate, immersive dining experience, 12 guests—a mix of international visitors and Portuguese regulars—gather each summer and early-autumn night around a counter in an open-air pavilion deep within the hotel’s 16,000-square-foot organic garden. Chef Tiago Santos and his deputies create a different tasting menu each day, based on which of the garden’s 300 varieties of vegetables and herbs are at their peak, as well as sustainably caught fish and pasture-fed meats from trusted local suppliers. They use only ancestral cooking methods, and fire plays a leading role.

The Chef's Garden Dinner at Rosewood Castiglion del Bosco

This Tuscan resort, which resembles a medieval village more than a traditional hotel, is also hosting intimate dinners during the month of August based on seasonal vegetables from the chef’s organic garden, as well as traditional regional dishes, enhanced by barbecue cooking.

Viceroy Snowmass's farmstead dinner

Earlier this summer, this mountain resort organized a table-to-farm dinner at Sustainable Settings, a farm in Carbondale, just down the Roaring Fork Valley from Snowmass. Given the resort’s emphasis on biking in the summer, intrepid guests rode to the site with a former Tour de France racer. It was a one-off experience could be replicated on request until the end of summer.

A bridal shower setup at Montage Laguna Beach's studio restaurant

The resort’s Forbes Five-Star restaurant, Studio, is also the site of some fantastic alfresco dining. The meals take place in Studio’s 1,000-square-foot raised-bed garden, which currently grows cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, lemon verbena, Swiss chard, shishito peppers, Valencia oranges, kumquats, figs, artichokes and edible flowers. Whatever is in season figures prominently in the gourmet vegetarian tasting menu (which is offered alongside a more traditional omnivore menu). Oh, and there are tremendous views over the Pacific.

Vineyard Dining at the Vines of Mendoza

Star chef Francis Mallmann is behind the Siete Fuegos (seven fires, a reference to the cooking methods) restaurant at this resort, so none of the meals disappoints. But while the dining room is lovely, a more memorable experience is a private dinner in the vineyards. After sampling snacks (local chacuterie and cheese) and empanadas, guests enjoy a four-course meal prepared by one of Mallmann’s deputies, using ingredients from the robust on-site gardens and paired with boutique wines from the Vines’ private vineyards. (Dinners in the garden are also possible.)

Lunch at the Pha Tad Ke Botanical Garden

Fifteen minutes by private boat from Luang Prabang, this botanical garden, the first of its kind in Laos, is also pioneering table-to-garden dining. Visitors sit in a sala amid the plants and flowers and savor a freshly made lunch using vegetables, herbs, bamboo and ginger grown in other parts of the gardens and its permaculture demonstration farm.

A far cry from the mass-market boozy restaurants in Cabo San Lucas, this cozy restaurant is set amid the organic fields and gardens of the 25-acre Flora Farms, in the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains near San José del Cabo. When Gloria Greene opened the original restaurant (in town), called Flora, it was the first organic restaurant in the area, and it soon became clear to her that if she wanted organic ingredients she would need to start her own farm. Soon she began hosting charity culinary events for the Humane Society, and the chefs from Cabo’s top resorts discovered her produce—Charlie Trotter, who was overseeing the “C” restaurant at One & Only Palmilla at the time, was the first customer for “by request” heirloom varieties. Later, Greene persuaded Trotter’s former executive chef, Guillermo Tellez, to join her team. Now the restaurant serves only what is made, grown and raised there (they ranch pork, chicken and eggs, but there’s no beef on the menu, as it’s unsustainable in Cabo’s dry climate) and have an onsite bakery for wood-fired artisan breads. Cooking classes are also on offer.

This luxury safari lodge completed it’s shamba (Swahili for vegetable garden) earlier this year. Now it offers private lunches in those gardens, under romantic towering shade trees. Guests pick their own ingredients, and the culinary team washes and readies them for the freshest possible salad.

I discovered this gem of an agritourismo during a hiking excursion set up by the nearby Monastero Santa Rosa. That hotel drips with luxury on a prime position on the Amalfi Coast the homey, simple restaurant inland drips with authenticity. The open-air dining room is set amid scenic lemon groves, and most of the food that is served is grown on the on-site gardens.

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury

I've been an award-winning travel writer and editor for 19 years – including several as a senior editor at ForbesLife – and I've written about more than 600 luxury destinations and hotels in 97 countries (and counting). I know the difference between what’s merely expensive and what deserves its high price tag. I’m discerning but not jaded, and I appreciate the hard work that goes into crafting experiences as well as crafting luxury goods. (I’ve written about those, too.) I’ve shared that wisdom with readers of Forbes, Departures, Conde Nast Traveler, Robb Report, Afar, National Geographic Traveler, Islands, Hemispheres, Brides, Modern Bride, Luxury SpaFinder, Well + Good, and other publications. In the name of lifestyle journalism, I’ve gotten a tattoo in Bora Bora, been bitten by a massage therapist, and flown small aircraft above three continents.


Watch the video: MUTANT - Dining With Dusty Vegan Edition - With Nicole Aniston at Marketplace, Temecula CA (May 2022).